From American Scientist, a review of Mothers and Others: The Evolutionary Origins of Mutual Understanding by Sarah Blaffer Hrdy; a review of Europe Between the Oceans: 9000 B.C.–A.D. 1000 by Barry Cunliffe (and an excerpt); a review of Supersizing the Mind: Embodiment, Action, and Cognitive Extension by Andy Clark; a review of The Great Equations: Breakthroughs in Science from Pythagoras to Heisenberg by Robert P. Crease; a review of Evolution: The First Four Billion Years by Michael Ruse; a review of Blown to Bits: Your Life, Liberty, and Happiness After the Digital Explosion by Hal Abelson; a review of The Grid Book by Hannah B Higgins; and a review of The Tropics of Empire: Why Columbus Sailed South to the Indies by Nicolas Wey Gomez. Ray Kurzweil on a university for the coming singularity. Spin Control: For the hopefuls at the Maryland State Yo-yo Contest, it's a series of ups and downs. A review of The Waxman Report: How Congress Really Works by Henry Waxman with Joshua Green (and more and more). Neo-Nazis are in the Army now: Why the U.S. military is ignoring its own regulations and permitting white supremacists to join its ranks.


The first chapter from The Balance of Nature: Ecology's Enduring Myth by John Kricher. An excerpt from The Late Age of Print: Everyday Book Culture from Consumerism to Control by Ted Striphas. Blogs can be sloppy and vitriolic, but they are also a breeding ground for original voices. Will we decamp for the northern rim? Laurence C. Smith investigates. Should we be spending more money on fixing the banks or on a second stimulus? A review of books marking the 40th anniversary of Apollo 11. Can university subjects reveal terrorists in the making? Wire Power: How to send electricity across the continent, virtually for free. The introduction to When Experiments Travel: Clinical Trials and the Global Search for Human Subjects by Adriana Petryna. A review of God, the Best, and Evil by Bruce Langtry. The introduction to Schoolhouses, Courthouses, and Statehouses: Solving the Funding-Achievement Puzzle in America's Public Schools by Eric A. Hanushek and Alfred A. Lindseth. The reports of the death of science have been greatly exaggerated. What board games taught us about the economy: The not-so-great financial lessons we learned as kids.


Still ugly after all these years: The endurance of "The Ugly American" may say less about its literary merits than about its failure to alter attitudes. "People are morons": An interview with Michael Wolff on why reputations can be deceiving. A review of Wednesday Martin's Stepmonster: A New Look at Why Real Stepmothers Think, Feel and Act the Way We Do. A review of The King of Vodka: The Story of Pyotr Smirnov and the Upheaval of an Empire by Linda Himelstein. What makes so academic laboratories such dangerous places to work? Reading books that don't exist: A group of artists has manufactured 40 books previously only available in imaginary form. A review of John F. Haught's God and the New Atheism: A Critical Response to Dawkins, Harris, and Hitchens. A review of Dread: How Fear and Fantasy Have Fuelled Epidemics from the Black Death to the Avian Flu by Philip Alcabes. A look at why we cling to outdated medical myths. Stored near a beer cooler and sent through the mail, Albert Einstein's unusual brain comes under renewed study. A review of The Constitution of Equality: Democratic Authority and Its Limits by Thomas Christiano.


From The Bulletin of Atomic Scientists, George Perkovich and James M. Acton rebut the standard arguments against disarmament. Think small to tackle the world's problems: The defects of minilateralism pale in comparison with the stalemate characterising modern multilateralism. Where the payoffs are big, so are the paychecks: The rest of the country may be stuck in a nasty recession, but on Wall Street, where it all began, business is booming. From TNR, why Sotomayor felt the need to make her "wise Latina" comment (it's the same reason why Michelle Obama said she was proud of her country "for the first time"); and why isn't Obama appointing young judges to the circuit courts? Why girls have BFFs and boys hang out in packs: Pardon the sexism, but a question — why are girls so girly? A review of Sharon Moalem's How Sex Works: Why We Look, Smell, Taste, Feel, and Act the Way We Do. Hands or paws or anything they got: Do animals masturbate? An interview with African-American atheist Sikivu Hutchinson on the need for black atheists to play a critical role in the atheism movement. An interview with Rick Perlstein on Nixonland (and an excerpt at Bookforum).

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