A new issue of International Indigenous Policy Journal is out. India Reed Bowers (Utrecht): Indigenous Decolonization and United Nations Membership: Indigenous Peoples and the Fundamental Right to Self-Determination. Md. Atiquar Rahman (Dhaka): Problems and Prospects of Development: Intervention for the Indigenous People Bangladesh. Devika Mittal (South Asian University): The Tribal Debate of Integration v/s Assimilation: A Study of the Jarawas of the Great Andaman. From Vice, Oscar Rickett interviews a member of the Jarawa, a human safari tribe. The Lost Tribes of the Amazon: Often described as “uncontacted,” isolated groups living deep in the South American forest resist the ways of the modern world — at least for now. Garrett Nichols reviews When Did Indians Become Straight? Kinship, the History of Sexuality, and Native Sovereignty by Mark Rifkin.


Salvador Santino Jr. F Regilme (Berlin): Social Discipline, Democracy, and Modernity: Are They All Uniquely “European”? Fiscal policy is, indeed, a moral issue, and we should be ashamed of what we’re doing to the next generation’s economic prospects — but our sin involves investing too little, not borrowing too much. Why the GOP is killing the Post Office: The conventional wisdom is that the US Postal Service is closing post offices and ending Saturday service because it's broke — don't believe it. When Google lost its cool: In his prescient 2011 book The Googlization of Everything (And Why We Should Worry), Siva Vaidhyanathan opened his preface by observing that “it’s no surprise that we hold the company in deific awe and respect” — March 2013 has been the month that Siva’s chickens came home to roost. Harry Eyres reviews Confronting the Classics by Mary Beard.


Michael J. Zimmer (Loyola): Inequality, Individualized Risk, and Insecurity. From Logos, a special section on American Labor. From Salon, a series called Working Ahead examines key issues facing the modern American worker. From Monthly Review, Fred Magdoff and John Bellamy Foster on class war and labor’s declining share; and Joe R. Feagin reviews The Production of Difference: Race and the Management of Labor in U.S. History by David Roediger and Elizabeth Esch. David Moberg on how the AFL-CIO has a plan to save the movement. From Dissent, Colin Gordon on the arc of inequality: As union power has declined, so too has the share of national income going to wages and salaries; and the franchise fight: Andrew Elrod on how workers look to hold fast-food corporations accountable. Sophie Quinton on the Trader Joe's lesson: Companies that invest in higher salaries for low-level employees find success in a competitive market.


Shyamkrishna Balganesh (Penn): Gandhi and Copyright Pragmatism. Why not separate marriage and state? John Fund on how cultural civil war can be avoided by getting government out of marriage. As the Supreme Court mulls gay marriage, states tackle a different question: which bathrooms should transgender citizens use? Statutes of limitations are expiring on some Bush crimes: Bush lied, people died — will anyone be prosecuted? Downton Abbey and the Fantasy of Structured Idleness: Karen Tongson on work and idleness in the age of the Great Recession. The Chosen Facial Hair: Beards are having their pop cultural moment, but Jews have always known the value of a furry face. Scientists identify why some fathers are left holding the baby. Never a magic bullet: Ryan Somma on the personal and public dimensions of gun ownership and gun violence.


From Dummies.com, what evidence supports the theory of evolution? Swallows may be evolving to dodge traffic: Road-kill numbers of roadside-nesting cliff swallows have dropped as birds shorten their wings to become more agile. Clive Cookson reviews Creation: The Origin of Life/The Future of Life by Adam Rutherford. The evolution of a theory: Marek Kohn reviews Darwin Deleted: Imagining a World without Darwin by Peter J Bowler. Ian Tattersall on remembering Stephen Jay Gould: The evolutionist taught anthropologists that human evolution was not a special case of anything. The director of evolution: Jennifer Ouellette on how Frances Arnold mutates DNA and breeds strange, new, and useful creatures. Laura Miller reviews Paleofantasy: What Evolution Really Tells Us About Sex, Diet and How We Live by Marlene Zuk (and more). It's in the cards: Human evolution influences gamblers' decisions, study shows.

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