Portland

upcoming events

  • Abigail Scott Duniway and Susan B. Anthony in Oregon

    It was the spring of 1871. Pioneer entrepreneur Abigail Scott Duniway, on a business trip to purchase stock for her millinery store back in Oregon, waited breathlessly outside the suffrage convention in San Francisco. She hoped to meet Susan B. Anthony, whose career she so admired. And so they met,…

    It was the spring of 1871. Pioneer entrepreneur Abigail Scott Duniway, on a business trip to purchase stock for her millinery store back in Oregon, waited breathlessly outside the suffrage convention in San Francisco. She hoped to meet Susan B. Anthony, whose career she so admired. And so they met, sparking a relationship that dramatically altered Duniway's life. The duo traveled for months on horseback, carriage, train, and boat in their crucial, successful effort to ensure the right to vote for women nationwide. In Abigail Scott Duniway and Susan B. Anthony in Oregon: Hesitate No Longer (History Press), author Jennifer Chambers revives the inspirational fight for women's rights by examining the dynamic between these two powerful women and how they changed not just the Beaver State, but the country as a whole.

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  • Karen Karbo in Conversation With Olivia Olivia

    Smart, sassy, and unapologetically feminine, Karen Karbo’s new book, In Praise of Difficult Women: Life Lessons From 29 Heroines Who Dared to Break the Rules (National Geographic), is an ode to the bold and charismatic women of modern history. Karbo, author of The Gospel According to Coco Chanel, …

    Smart, sassy, and unapologetically feminine, Karen Karbo’s new book, In Praise of Difficult Women: Life Lessons From 29 Heroines Who Dared to Break the Rules (National Geographic), is an ode to the bold and charismatic women of modern history. Karbo, author of The Gospel According to Coco Chanel, spotlights the spirited rule breakers who charted their way with little regard for expectations: Frida Kahlo, Elizabeth Taylor, Nora Ephron, Carrie Fisher, Amelia Earhart, Helen Gurley Brown, Edie Sedgwick, Hillary Clinton, Amy Poehler, and Shonda Rhimes, among others. Their lives — imperfect, elegant, messy, glorious — provide inspiration and instruction for the new age of feminism we have entered. Karbo distills these lessons with wit and humor, examining the universal themes that connect us to each of these mesmerizing personalities today: success and style, love and authenticity, daring and courage. Being “difficult,” Karbo reveals, might not make life easier. But it can make it more fulfilling — whatever that means for you. Karbo will be joined in conversation by Olivia Olivia, author of No One Remembered Your Name but I Wrote It Down.

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  • Call Me by Your Name

    André Aciman's Call Me by Your Name (Picador) is the story of a sudden and powerful romance that blossoms between an adolescent boy and a summer guest at his parents' cliffside mansion on the Italian Riviera. Each is unprepared for the consequences of their attraction, when, during the restless summer…

    André Aciman's Call Me by Your Name (Picador) is the story of a sudden and powerful romance that blossoms between an adolescent boy and a summer guest at his parents' cliffside mansion on the Italian Riviera. Each is unprepared for the consequences of their attraction, when, during the restless summer weeks, unrelenting currents of obsession, fascination, and desire intensify their passion and test the charged ground between them. Recklessly, the two verge toward the one thing both fear they may never truly find again: total intimacy. It is an instant classic and one of the great love stories of our time. Aciman's critically acclaimed debut novel is a frank, unsentimental, heartrending elegy to human passion — winner of the Lambda Literary Award for Fiction and now a major motion picture.

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  • Elif Batuman

    The year is 1995, and email is new. Selin, the daughter of Turkish immigrants, arrives for her freshman year at Harvard. She signs up for classes in subjects she has never heard of, befriends her charismatic Serbian classmate, Svetlana, and, almost by accident, begins corresponding with Ivan, an …

    The year is 1995, and email is new. Selin, the daughter of Turkish immigrants, arrives for her freshman year at Harvard. She signs up for classes in subjects she has never heard of, befriends her charismatic Serbian classmate, Svetlana, and, almost by accident, begins corresponding with Ivan, an older mathematics student from Hungary. Selin may have barely spoken to Ivan, but with each email they exchange, the act of writing seems to take on new and increasingly mysterious meanings. At the end of the school year, Ivan goes to Budapest for the summer, and Selin heads to the Hungarian countryside to teach English. On the way, she spends two weeks visiting Paris with Svetlana. Selin’s summer in Europe does not resonate with anything she has previously heard about the typical experiences of American college students, or indeed of any other kinds of people. For Selin, this is a journey further inside herself: a coming to grips with the ineffable and exhilarating confusion of first love, and with the growing consciousness that she is doomed to become a writer. With superlative emotional and intellectual sensitivity, mordant wit, and pitch-perfect style, Elif Batuman dramatizes the uncertainty of life on the cusp of adulthood. Batuman’s The Idiot (Penguin) is a heroic yet self-effacing reckoning with the terror and joy of becoming a person in a world that is as intoxicating as it is disquieting.

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