• s

  • m

  • t

  • w

  • h

  • f

  • s

  • 26

  • 27

  • 28

  • 1

  • 2

  • 3

  • 4

  • 5

  • 6

  • 7

  • 8

  • 9

  • 10

  • 11

  • 12

  • 13

  • 14

  • 15

  • 16

  • 17

  • 18

  • 19

  • 20

  • 21

  • 22

  • 23

  • 24

  • 25

  • 26

  • 27

  • 28

  • 29

  • 30

  • 31

  • 1



Magers & Quinn Booksellers

3038 Hennepin Avenue, Minneapolis, MN 55408

previous events

  • Greg Barnhisel reads from Cold War Modernists: Art, Literature, and American Cultural Diplomacy

    American cultural diplomats of the 1940s and 1950s sought to show European intellectuals that the United States had more to offer than military power and commercial exploitation. Through magazines, traveling art exhibits, touring musical shows, radio programs, book translations, and conferences, they…

    American cultural diplomats of the 1940s and 1950s sought to show European intellectuals that the United States had more to offer than military power and commercial exploitation. Through magazines, traveling art exhibits, touring musical shows, radio programs, book translations, and conferences, they deployed the revolutionary aesthetics of modernism to prove—particularly to the leftists whose Cold War loyalties they hoped to secure—that American art and literature were culturally rich and politically significant.

    Yet by repurposing modernism, American diplomats and cultural authorities remade the once revolutionary movement into a content-free collection of artistic techniques suitable for middlebrow consumption. They turned the avant-garde into the establishment. Cold War Modernists documents how the CIA, the State Department, and private cultural diplomats transformed modernist art and literature into pro-Western propaganda during the Cold War. Drawing on interviews, previously unknown archival materials, and the stories of such figures and institutions as William Faulkner, Stephen Spender, Irving Kristol, James Laughlin, and the Voice of America, Barnhisel documents how the U.S. government reconfigured modernism as a trans-Atlantic movement, a joint endeavor between American and European artists, with profound implications for the art that followed and the character of American identity in the twentieth century.

    Greg Barnhisel teaches in the English department at Duquesne University in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. His previous books include James Laughlin, New Directions,and the Remaking of Ezra Pound and Pressing the Fight: Print, Propaganda, and the Cold War.

    MORE ABOUT THIS EVENT
  • Maggie Messitt reads from The Rainy Season: Three Lives in the New South Africa

    Just across the northern border of a former apartheid-era homeland sits the the remote bushveld community of Rooiboklaagte, caught between a traditional past and a western future, a racially charged history and a pseudo-democratic present. The Rainy Season introduces readers to and opens a window …

    Just across the northern border of a former apartheid-era homeland sits the the remote bushveld community of Rooiboklaagte, caught between a traditional past and a western future, a racially charged history and a pseudo-democratic present. The Rainy Season introduces readers to and opens a window into the complicated reality of daily life in South Africa, telling the stories of three generations in the Rainbow Nation one decade after its first democratic elections. This multi-threaded narrative follows Regina, a tapestry weaver in her sixties, standing at the crossroads where her Catholic faith and the AIDS pandemic crash; Thoko, a middle-aged sangoma (traditional healer) taking steps to turn her shebeen into a fully licensed tavern; and Dankie, a young man taking his matriculation exams, coming of age as one of Mandela’s Children, the first academic class educated entirely under democratic governance.

    An independent narrative and immersion journalist, Maggie Messitt has spent the last decade reporting from inside underserved communities in southern Africa and middle America. A dual-citizen, Messitt lived in South Africa from 2003 to 2011. During this time, she was the founding director of a writing school for rural African women, editor of its community newspaper and international literary magazine, and a freelance reporter. Messitt currently resides in Athens, Ohio, where she’s completing her doctorate in creative nonfiction at Ohio University.

    —-

    Advanced Praise for The Rainy Season:

    “Whether safari travelogues or tributes to the legacy of Nelson Mandela, what most Americans read about South Africa is far more superficial than Maggie Messitt’s gritty vision of the country. In the tradition of writers like James Agee and Katherine Boo, she has immersed herself deeply in the everyday lives of people struggling with AIDS, early death, corruption, false promises, grinding rural poverty, and the daily struggle to make ends meet in a society that tourists and most foreign correspondents never see. This is a profoundly compassionate book, that truly takes you inside the lives of those in it.” —Adam Hochschild, author pf King Leopold’s Ghost: A Story of Greed, Terror, and Heroism in Colonial Africa

    “The Rainy Season is a delight of closely observed detail from the lives of three memorable characters in a remote South African village. Skillfully taking us through the quiet drama of an unusually generous rainy season in the bushveld, Messitt gives an insight into a world that is key to understanding South Africa today.” —Greg Marinovich, author, The Bang-Bang Club: Snapshots from a Hidden War.

    MORE ABOUT THIS EVENT
  • Maggie Messitt | The Rainy Season: Three Lives in the New South Africa

    Just across the northern border of a former apartheid-era homeland sits the the remote bushveld community of Rooiboklaagte, caught between a traditional past and a western future, a racially charged history and a pseudo-democratic present. The Rainy Season introduces readers to and opens a window …

    Just across the northern border of a former apartheid-era homeland sits the the remote bushveld community of Rooiboklaagte, caught between a traditional past and a western future, a racially charged history and a pseudo-democratic present. The Rainy Season introduces readers to and opens a window into the complicated reality of daily life in South Africa, telling the stories of three generations in the Rainbow Nation one decade after its first democratic elections. This multi-threaded narrative follows Regina, a tapestry weaver in her sixties, standing at the crossroads where her Catholic faith and the AIDS pandemic crash; Thoko, a middle-aged sangoma (traditional healer) taking steps to turn her shebeen into a fully licensed tavern; and Dankie, a young man taking his matriculation exams, coming of age as one of Mandela’s Children, the first academic class educated entirely under democratic governance.

    An independent narrative and immersion journalist, Maggie Messitt has spent the last decade reporting from inside underserved communities in southern Africa and middle America. A dual-citizen, Messitt lived in South Africa from 2003 to 2011. During this time, she was the founding director of a writing school for rural African women, editor of its community newspaper and international literary magazine, and a freelance reporter. Messitt currently resides in Athens, Ohio, where she’s completing her doctorate in creative nonfiction at Ohio University.

    MORE ABOUT THIS EVENT
  • Matthew Thomas reads from We Are Not Ourselves

    Destined to be a classic, this “powerfully moving” (Chad Harbach, The Art of Fielding), multigenerational debut novel of an Irish-American family is nothing short of a “masterwork” (Joshua Ferris, Then We Came to the End). Born in 1941, Eileen Tumulty is raised by her Irish immigrant parents in …

    Destined to be a classic, this “powerfully moving” (Chad Harbach, The Art of Fielding), multigenerational debut novel of an Irish-American family is nothing short of a “masterwork” (Joshua Ferris, Then We Came to the End).

    Born in 1941, Eileen Tumulty is raised by her Irish immigrant parents in Woodside, Queens, in an apartment where the mood swings between heartbreak and hilarity, depending on whether guests are over and how much alcohol has been consumed.

    When Eileen meets Ed Leary, a scientist whose bearing is nothing like those of the men she grew up with, she thinks she’s found the perfect partner to deliver her to the cosmopolitan world she longs to inhabit. They marry, and Eileen quickly discovers Ed doesn’t aspire to the same, ever bigger, stakes in the American Dream.

    Eileen encourages her husband to want more: a better job, better friends, a better house, but as years pass it becomes clear that his growing reluctance is part of a deeper psychological shift. An inescapable darkness enters their lives, and Eileen and Ed and their son Connell try desperately to hold together a semblance of the reality they have known, and to preserve, against long odds, an idea they have cherished of the future.

    Through the Learys, novelist Matthew Thomas charts the story of the American Century, particularly the promise of domestic bliss and economic prosperity that captured hearts and minds after WWII. The result is a riveting and affecting work of art; one that reminds us that life is more than a tally of victories and defeats, that we live to love and be loved, and that we should tell each other so before the moment slips away.

    Epic in scope, heroic in character, masterful in prose, We Are Not Ourselves heralds the arrival of a major new talent in contemporary fiction.

    Matthew Thomas was born in the Bronx and grew up in Queens. A graduate of the University of Chicago, he has an MA from the Writing Seminars at Johns Hopkins University and an MFA from the University of California, Irvine. His New York Times-bestselling novel We Are Not Ourselves has been shortlisted for the Flaherty-Dunnan First Novel Prize from the Center for Fiction, longlisted for the Guardian First Book Award, nominated for the Folio Prize, and named a Notable Book of the year by the New York Times. He lives with his wife and twin children in New Jersey.

    MORE ABOUT THIS EVENT
  • Scott Barnett presents Gumption: Taking Bubba Gump from Movie to Restaurant

    This is the story about how maverick restaurant CEO, Scott Barnett, gambled his reputation on an idea of creating a restaurant chain, Bubba Gump Shrimp Company, out of a single movie. Written in a cinematic style, Gumption: Taking Bubba Gump from Movie to Restaurant is about the creation, growth, …

    This is the story about how maverick restaurant CEO, Scott Barnett, gambled his reputation on an idea of creating a restaurant chain, Bubba Gump Shrimp Company, out of a single movie.

    Written in a cinematic style, Gumption: Taking Bubba Gump from Movie to Restaurant is about the creation, growth, and sale of the Bubba Gump Shrimp Company. The concept began when Paramount Pictures reached out to see if there was interest in creating a restaurant based on the movie Forrest Gump. It is also the personal story of the author’s growth as a CEO and creator of restaurant concepts. A host of situations are described such as restaurant concept creation, high stakes boardroom confrontations, and escaping corrupt officials in foreign lands. The narrative is partly an unvarnished peak behind the everyday scenes of restaurants, movie studios, and Wall Street.

    Gumption is not only a behind the scenes look at the very unusual world of restaurants, it also tells the inside story of movie studio machinations, corporate politics, and the trials and tribulations of expanding a global business with built-in brand recognition and goodwill.

    Scott Barnett is a well-known figure on the US and international restaurant scene. He was President and CEO of Rusty Pelican Restaurants, Inc. from 1992 until 1998, and was Found and CEO of Bubba Gump Shrimp Company Restaurants from its inception. After selling the company in 2011, he worked as Senior Adviser with Pulo Run Capital Partners, an Asia-based Investment Bank and Private Equity firm in Hong Kong. Barnett has actively consulted with a number of restaurant companies world-wide and is a recipient of numerous awards within the hospitality industry. He is a recognized expert on transactions, branding, concept development and overall operations.

    MORE ABOUT THIS EVENT
  • Tom Weber presents 100 Things to Do in the Twin Cities Before You Die

    It's hard enough to learn and master one city, but twin cities? Behold, the essential guide awaits you to achieve the most rewarding bucket list entries for the good people of the Twin Cities. Whether it's strolling the Stone Arch Bridge in Minneapolis, sipping a drink on the Frost's patio in St. …

    It's hard enough to learn and master one city, but twin cities?

    Behold, the essential guide awaits you to achieve the most rewarding bucket list entries for the good people of the Twin Cities. Whether it's strolling the Stone Arch Bridge in Minneapolis, sipping a drink on the Frost's patio in St. Paul on a warm summer's night, or biking to Stillwater for lunch on the St. Croix River, we've got you covered. We're ready to equip you with outdoor activities that will let you declare victory over the harsh Minnesota winters, but there are also plenty of indoor items for when Jack Frost truly has it in for you. The hearty Minnesotan will know it's a fool's errand to let weather dictate life's pleasures, and a good century of items for all seasons awaits you. Two truly is better than one, and the Twin Cities are waiting to be explored.

    Tom Weber is a host for Minnesota Public Radio News. Originally from the Chicago area, he was familiar with cold and winter. But upon moving here at the start of a two-week, below-zero cold snap, Tom quickly embraced all things Minnesota. He lives in St. Paul and generally likes to spend his free time outside (even in the winter) and enjoys biking, hiking, running and cross-country skiing. 100 Things to Do in the Twin Cities Before You Die is his first book.

    We will also be holding a special raffle for this event, featuring prizes from a number of the places mentioned in the book! You can enter in the store starting Monday, May 18th in the store, and prizes will be drawn on May 27th immediately following the event. Must be present to win

    Raffle includes prizes from:

    Brave New Workshop

    The Depot Ice Rink

    Foshay Museum and Observation Deck

    Matt's Bar

    Minnesota Institute of Arts

    Steamboat Minnehaha

    Twin City Model Railroad Museum

    MORE ABOUT THIS EVENT
  • Whisper Hollow

    by Chris Cander

    Other Press

    $17.95 List Price

    For more info visit:
    Amazon • IndieBound • Barnes & Noble

    Chris Cander | Whisper Hollow

    One morning in Verra, a town nestled into the hillsides of West Virginia, the young Myrthen Bergmann is playing tug-of-war with her twin, when her sister is killed. Unable to accept her own guilt, Myrthen excludes herself from all forms of friendship and affection and begins a twisted, haunted life…

    One morning in Verra, a town nestled into the hillsides of West Virginia, the young Myrthen Bergmann is playing tug-of-war with her twin, when her sister is killed. Unable to accept her own guilt, Myrthen excludes herself from all forms of friendship and affection and begins a twisted, haunted life dedicated to God. Meanwhile, her neighbor Alta Krol longs to be an artist even as her days are taken up caring for her widowed father and siblings.

    Everything changes when Myrthen marries the man Alta loves. Fourteen years later, we meet Lidia, a teenage girl in the same town, and her precocious son, Gabriel. When Gabriel starts telling eerily prescient stories that hint at Verra’s long-buried secrets, it’s not long before the townspeople begin to suspect that the boy harbors evil spirits—an irresistible state of affairs for Myrthen and her obsession with salvation.

    MORE ABOUT THIS EVENT
  • Ellen Meeropol presents On Hurricane Island

    As a major hurricane threatens the northeast, math professor Gandalf Cohen is abducted by federal agents and flown to a secret interrogation center off the coast of Maine. Austin Coombs, a young local resident, is a newly hired civilian guard assigned to the detention center. Henry Ames, a man of …

    As a major hurricane threatens the northeast, math professor Gandalf Cohen is abducted by federal agents and flown to a secret interrogation center off the coast of Maine. Austin Coombs, a young local resident, is a newly hired civilian guard assigned to the detention center. Henry Ames, a man of personal secrets, is the FBI special agent in charge of Gandalf's case and doubts the professor's terrorist involvement; Tobias, his second-in-command, disagrees, preferring violent interrogation. As the hurricane slams the shore, conflict detonates and each character must choose a side if they're to survive the storm.

    Told over the five days approaching the anniversary of 9/11, by varying voices on both extremes of the political divide, On Hurricane Island is both a fast-paced political thriller and a literary examination of the sociopolitical storm facing our society. How far should government go in the name of protecting our national security? What happens when governmental powers of surveillance and extra-legal interrogation are expanded? How free are we?

    A former nurse practitioner and part-time bookseller, Ellen Meeropol is the author of one previous novel, House Arrest. She lives and writes in Western Massachusetts.

    MORE ABOUT THIS EVENT
  • Descent:

    A Novel

    by Tim Johnston

    Algonquin Books

    $25.95 List Price

    For more info visit:
    Amazon • IndieBound • Barnes & Noble

    Algonquin Roundtable featuring Algonquin authors Tim Johnston, Jill McCorkle, Bill Roorbach, and more

    Join us for a special Algonquin Roundtable featuring the following Algonquin authors: Tim Johnston, author of debut novel Descent; Jill McCorkle, Life After Life; Bill Roorbach, Life Among Giants and The Remedy for Love; Brock Clarke, An Arsonist's Guide to Writers Homes in New England and The …

    Join us for a special Algonquin Roundtable featuring the following Algonquin authors:

    Tim Johnston, author of debut novel Descent; Jill McCorkle, Life After Life; Bill Roorbach, Life Among Giants and The Remedy for Love; Brock Clarke, An Arsonist's Guide to Writers Homes in New England and The Happiest People in the World; Lauren Grodstein, A Friend of the Family and An Explanation for Everything; Gina Frangello, A Life in Men; Michael Parker, All I Have in This World and The Watery Part of the World.

    The authors will read and do a question and answer session. This event is free and open to the public.

    MORE ABOUT THIS EVENT
  • Launch of Elm Leaves Journal's Wild and Harvest editions

    SUNY-Buffalo State's literary journal, ELJ (Elm Leaves Journal) celebrates the launch of its Wild and Harvest editions, with readings by: Kim Chinquee, Paul Lisicky, Gregory Lawless, Robert Lopez, Ted Pelton, Trevor Dodge, Kathy Fish, and Peter Ramos. Elm Leaves Journal is Buffalo State's historic…

    SUNY-Buffalo State's literary journal, ELJ (Elm Leaves Journal) celebrates the launch of its Wild and Harvest editions, with readings by:

    Kim Chinquee, Paul Lisicky, Gregory Lawless, Robert Lopez, Ted Pelton, Trevor Dodge, Kathy Fish, and Peter Ramos.

    Elm Leaves Journal is Buffalo State's historic literary and arts journal. In production since 1948, Elm Leaves Journal has been administered, edited and produced by students at Buffalo State College.

    MORE ABOUT THIS EVENT
  • Versed (Wesleyan Poetry)

    by Rae Armantrout

    Wesleyan

    $22.95 List Price

    For more info visit:
    Amazon • IndieBound • Barnes & Noble

    BOMB Magazine and Two Dollar Radio present arah Gerard, Ian Dreiblatt, Nicholas Rombes, and Rae Armantrout

    Join BOMB Magazine and Two Dollar Radio for a reading with Sarah Gerard, Ian Dreiblatt, Nicholas Rombes, and Rae Armantrout.

  • A Fireproof Home for the Bride:

    A Novel

    by Amy Scheibe

    St. Martin's Press

    $26.99 List Price

    For more info visit:
    Amazon • IndieBound • Barnes & Noble

    Amy Scheibe | A Fireproof Home for the Bride

    Emmaline Nelson and her sister Birdie grow up in the hard, cold, rural Lutheran world of strict parents, strict milking times, and strict morals. Marriage is preordained and though it’s 1958, southern Minnesota did not see changing roles for women on the horizon. Caught in a time bubble between a …

    Emmaline Nelson and her sister Birdie grow up in the hard, cold, rural Lutheran world of strict parents, strict milking times, and strict morals. Marriage is preordained and though it’s 1958, southern Minnesota did not see changing roles for women on the horizon.

    Caught in a time bubble between a world war and the ferment of the 1960’s, Emmy doesn’t question the path laid before her. Only when her fiancÚ shows his true colors and forces himself upon her does she find the courage to act. Readers will cheer for Emmy as she discovers her voice, moves from the farm to town, breaks her engagement, and finds a job as a switch board operator at the local newspaper, The Fargo Forum. She even falls for an absolutely forbidden suitor—a Catholic boy. Emmy quickly takes to the newsroom and hopes to break out as a reporter. Following her gut and inquisitive instincts, she discovers that the KKK is not only active in the Midwest, but that her family is involved. Her sense of the firm rules she grew up under—and their effect—begins to change completely.

    MORE ABOUT THIS EVENT
Advertisement