There's a lot more where that came from

R. Randall Kelso (South Texas): The Structure of Planned Parenthood v. Casey Abortion Rights Law: “Strict Scrutiny” for “Substantial Obstacles” on Abortion Choice and Otherwise “Reasonableness Balancing”. I’m a hot mess for Hillary: Rebecca Traister on why she feels “a complex, long-brewing mix of deep admiration and deep reservation”. Christopher Hale on Pope Francis’s public transformation on LGBT rights. The House’s Right flank finally got Boehner’s scalp — so why doesn’t it feel good? A

Paper Trail

Ira Silverberg—who has been the editor in chief of Grove Press, an agent at Donadio & Olson and at Sterling Lord Literistic, and the Literature Director of the National Endowment of for the Arts—has started a new position as senior editor at Simon & Schuster. In a new essay, author Jedediah Purdy dwells on the similarities


Sex and Hysteria in the 1980s

Richard BeckIn the 1980s, an idea took hold throughout the US that very young children existed in a near-constant state of sexual danger. A moral panic ensued, in which many day-care workers were wrongly accused

Daily Review

Eve's Hollywood

A golden girl in the Golden State, Eve Babitz, the daughter of a well-regarded Hollywood studio musician and goddaughter to Stravinsky, was seen—in all the places you go to be seen in Los Angeles—before she was heard. Her first book, the glossy, memoiristic essay


Sylvère Lotringer

Few people can be said to have singlehandedly introduced a new body of thought to a foreign country, but that is precisely what the critic, professor, and Semiotext(e) founder Sylvère Lotringer did throughout the 1970s and '80s.


The Banality of Optimism

Terry Eagleton

Nations, like political creeds, can be upbeat or downbeat. Along with North Korea, the United States is one of the few countries on earth in which optimism is almost a state ideology. For large sectors of the nation, to be bullish is to be patriotic, while negativity is a species of thought crime.