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Omnivore

A slippery slope

Amy Kapczynski (Yale): Why “Intellectual Property” Law? Laura Kasinof on how Yemen’s famine got so bad (and more). Zimbabwe’s Mugabe refuses to resign and dares his party to impeach him. There is a silent war on dissenting amusement afoot — but it’s a slippery slope we’re on when the criminalization of laughter can lead to punitive arrest, as in the case of activist Desiree Fairooz. Trump nominee Brett Talley’s apparent thoughts on capital punishment: “Just shoot them”. Slavoj Zizek on a great


Paper Trail

Anthony Scaramucci has been shopping around a book proposal about his torrid ten days in the White House. The Mooch now says he won’t go through with writing the proposed volume, because publishers are only interested in a tell-all, something a “facts guy” and true “team player” like himself just won’t do. However, the proposal,

Syllabi

The Manson Family

Eric Banks[Editor's note: This article originally appeared in 2009.] The Manson Family has been plumbed and probed inside out and upside down—there’s Joan Didion’s The White Album, Jerzy Kosinski’s Blind Date

Daily Review

Her Body and Other Parties

In the month since I began writing this review, allegations of sexual harassment by powerful men in the restaurant and entertainment industries, the art world, and the highest reaches of politics have become ubiquitous. A list of “shitty media men” circulated as a shared

Interviews

Tony Tulathimutte and Malcolm Harris

I met author Tony Tulathimutte at a reading in Manhattan where he asked the audience to vote on which section of his novel Private Citizens to read from: the one on writer’s workshops or the one on pornography. Porn won, and Tony delivered a complex, funny, and disturbing passage. Later, when I saw his blurb recommending Malcolm Harris’s new study, Kids These Days: Human Capital and the Making of Millennials, I read the book and was impressed by its sweeping socio-economic critique.

Video

Bookforum: “False Starts”

Conversation

A Broken Story: Jenny Erpenbeck's Refugee Novel

John Domini

Overseas, Jenny Erpenbeck’s latest novel has carried her to fresh levels of acclaim. She’s won not only the Thomas Mann Prize, in her native Germany, but also Italy’s Strega Europeo, something of a Booker for the Continent. Now the book is out in this country, under the title Go, Went, Gone, and though Erpenbeck’s four previous have won critical esteem—the New York Review of Books deemed her last novel “ferocious as well as virtuosic”—here,

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