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Omnivore

Everything about America

Joseph Baker (East Tennessee State): A Social Anthropology of Ghosts in Twenty-First-Century America. Fifty percent of Americans believe in some conspiracy theory — here’s why. For a rich country, America is unusually religious and optimistic. Timothy P. O'Neill (John Marshall): America the Eusocial. Guns, sex and arrogance: Sahana Singh hated everything about America — until she moved here. Witches and guns: Alycia Michelle Wilson on the intersection between Wicca and the Second Amendment. Kay


Paper Trail

In The Baffler, Evgeny Morozov writes about the problems of technology criticism (he thinks it is willfully oblivious to political and social realities), and explains why he’s decided to abandon the profession: “For a long time, I’ve considered myself a technology critic. Thus, I must acknowledge defeat as well: contemporary technology criticism in America is

Syllabi

Andre Dubus's best characters

Bibi DeitzAndre Dubus's literary superpower is to hit upon that one thing about a character that makes him him, or her her. And in so doing, with subtle, clever details—breadcrumbs on the trail to the nucleus

Daily Review

Provence, 1970: M. F. K. Fisher, Julia Child, James Beard, and the Reinvention of American Taste

Luke Barr's Provence, 1970: M. F. K. Fisher, Julia Child, James Beard, and the Reinvention of American Taste (Clarkson Potter, $15) would make a great film. There is gorgeous food, impressive scenery—all those twisty little roads and green vistas!—and lots of backstabbing.

Interviews

Jacob Rubin

Writing fiction about an impersonator is like playing Russian roulette with an allegory gun. Those who survive, whose books don't lapse into neat parables of the process of writing, tend to be brilliant. Examples include George Saunders (CivilWarLand in Bad Decline), Tom McCarthy (Remainder), and Pynchon (the reenactment of Alpdrucken in Gravity's Rainbow). The latest is Jacob Rubin, with his new novel The Poser, about the rise and fall of a gifted impressionist.

Appreciation

Repetition Compulsion

Namara Smith

Elena Ferrante is often asked about the classical influences in her work, and reading her early novels you can see why. They are strikingly compressed and spare, set largely in enclosed, almost anonymous, spaces that evoke the stage of a Greek drama, their focus turned inward. The Neapolitan series takes a different tack, resembling not the claustrophobic Greek tragedy but the expansive epic.

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