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Omnivore

Over the top

Peter Evans (Brown) and Evelyne Huber and John D. Stephens (UNC): The Political Foundations of State Effectiveness. I. Glenn Cohen (Harvard): Are All Abortions Equal? Should There Be Exceptions to the Criminalization of Abortion for Rape and Incest? From The Nation, are these two “culture wars” issues really that similar? Katha Pollitt on how there’s a reason gay marriage is winning, while abortion rights are losing. From TNR, Jeet Heer on acting without thinking: The most effective protest


Paper Trail

Tonight, St. Joseph’s College is hosting a birthday tribute to the late, great novelist Gilbert Sorrentino. Organized by Doubleday editor (and Bookforum contributor) Gerald Howard and Greenlight Bookstore, the event will feature readings and discussions of his work by a stellar group of admirers, including Don DeLillo, Sam Lipsyte, Joshua Cohen, Christopher Sorrentino, Mark Chiusano,

Syllabi

Life after Larsson

Morten Hi JensenWhere does the popularity of Stieg Larsson's sadistic Salander series leave the rest of Scandinavian literature in translation? In his shadow, it seems, or branded as a Crime Wave thriller—one can

Daily Review

The Fine Art of Fucking Up

Is the phrase "a farce set in art school" redundant? Cate Dicharry's first novel takes that view, and while this position could easily be insufferable as well as unnecessary—hitting the broad side of a barn is not exactly a daring challenge—she makes it an unvarnished delight. This is an especially wise authorial move given how well-worked a genre the campus novel is—and how brave or even foolhardy it is to follow the likes of Kingsley Amis, Mary McCarthy, and Randall Jarrell.

Interviews

Sarah Manguso

Sarah Manguso's latest book, Ongoingness: The End of a Diary, ostensibly about the eight-hundred-thousand-word journal she kept for twenty-five years, is in essence an act of withholding. On most pages, a few paragraphs or lines of text are surrounded by white space—precise moments suspended in the mass of formless, unrecorded time.

Essay

Dennis Cooper's Haunted HTML Novel

Paige K. Bradley

You could call Dennis Cooper's new HTML novel, Zac’s Haunted House, many things: net art, a glorified Tumblr, a visual novel, a mood board, or a dark night of the Internet's soul. It has just a few words—the chapter titles and a few subtitles embedded in some of the gifs—but it still very clearly belongs to Cooper’s own haunted oeuvre, capable of evoking powerful and gnarled emotions.

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