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Omnivore

The analytic-continental divide in political philosophy

David Owen (Southampton): Reason and Practices of Reasoning: On the Analytic-Continental Divide in Political Philosophy. From the forthcoming Oxford Handbook of Carl Schmitt, Matthew Specter (CCSU): What's “Left” in Schmitt? From Aversion to Appropriation in Contemporary Political Theory. Christian List and Laura Valentini (LSE): Political Theory. Francesco di Bernardo reviews The Misguided Search for the Political by Lois McNay. Thom Brooks (Durham): Why Political Theory Matters. A voice of


Paper Trail

New York Magazine has a timeline describing Rolling Stone’s handling of the University of Virginia rape story. Most recently, Rolling Stone has asked the Columbia University journalism school to independently review the editorial process behind the article. The magazine will publish the report once it’s concluded. The Columbia Journalism Review looks back at the past year’s worst mistakes

Syllabi

Andre Dubus's best characters

Bibi DeitzAndre Dubus's literary superpower is to hit upon that one thing about a character that makes him him, or her her. And in so doing, with subtle, clever details—breadcrumbs on the trail to the nucleus

Daily Review

Countdown to Zero Day

In Countdown to Zero Day Kim Zetter argues that our physical world is increasingly vulnerable to digital sabotage. Her vision of the future—which features computer viruses that can bring machinery and entire systems to a standstill—is hair-raising and, in light of the Sony hacks, increasingly relevant.

Interviews

Meghan Daum

Meghan Daum published her first collection of essays, My Misspent Youth (2001), to wide praise. In the title essay, Daum described living in Manhattan as a writer in her mid-twenties, and the difficulty of discerning truth from fantasy in a city that lends itself to easy mythologizing.

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Still Failing: Gary Shteyngart Returns

Excerpt

A Store of Half-Knowledge

Charles D'Ambrosio

The essay, at its best, is a genre shaped by the character of its author. Charles D’Ambrosio describes it as “a forum for self-doubt.” The author’s irresolution runs throughout Loitering, his new collection. “We are more intimately bound to one another by our kindred doubts than our brave conclusions,” he notes. By communicating uncertainty, D’Ambrosio eases its isolation.

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