Advertisement

Omnivore

A year after the Women’s March

One year after the Women’s March on Washington, people are still protesting en masse — a lot. Anna North on how the Women’s March made itself indispensable: Over the past year, the march has become a crucial hub for left-wing organizations, and a potent political force for 2018. Women’s March Inc., which organized the event in Washington, has encouraged more protests — but a new group is focused on winning elections, especially in red states. The other women’s march on Washington: Rebecca Traister


Paper Trail

In her new weekly column, Elena Ferrante recounts the first time she fell in love. On the occasion of her new essay collection, Feel Free, Zadie Smith fields questions from a number of people, including London mayor Sadiq Khan, cartoonist Chris Ware, Tate museum director Maria Balshaw, and authors Nikesh Shukla, Philip Pullman, and Matt

Syllabi

"We Are Revolution": Introducing Asia's Proletarian Lit

Matt TurnerDuring the last election cycle, the American working class got a lot of airplay. Donald Trump’s rhetoric was a throwback to a different era of politics and a different economy. Talk of American workers

Daily Review

The Years

“I have always wanted to write the sort of book that I find it impossible to talk about afterward, the sort of book that makes it impossible for me to withstand the gaze of others,” writes Annie Ernaux’s narrator near the end of her 1998 autofiction, Shame. Ernaux takes

Interviews

Tony Tulathimutte and Malcolm Harris

I met author Tony Tulathimutte at a reading in Manhattan where he asked the audience to vote on which section of his novel Private Citizens to read from: the one on writer’s workshops or the one on pornography. Porn won, and Tony delivered a complex, funny, and disturbing passage. Later, when I saw his blurb recommending Malcolm Harris’s new study, Kids These Days: Human Capital and the Making of Millennials, I read the book and was impressed by its sweeping socio-economic critique.

Video

Bookforum: “False Starts”

Conversation

Minds of the Immortals: Emily Wilson on translating "The Odyssey"

Ben Shields

“The minds of the immortals rarely change,” old King Nestor tells Telemachus in Book III of The Odyssey, That may be true, but the ways that we experience and imagine those gods change regularly, Since the sixteenth century, dozens of English-language translators have traversed the epics of archaic Hellas, and all of them have returned with their own unique account: Blank verse, couplets, and prose are all available portals into Homer.

Advertisement