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Omnivore

After the Arab Spring

From the New York Times Magazine, a special issue in how the Arab world came apart. Andrea Pin (Padua): The Arab Road to Dignity: The Goal of the “Arab Spring”. John Chalcraft (LSE): The Arab Uprisings of 2011 in Historical Perspective. After the Arab Spring, the ruining of Egypt: Repression and the incompetence of Abdel-Fattah al-Sisi are stoking the next uprising. Mohamed Abdelaal (Alexandria): The Paradox of Freedom of Religion in Post-Revolutionary Egypt. Yasmine El Rashidi on Egypt, forty-one


Paper Trail

Google has finally revealed why it shut down novelist Dennis Cooper’s blog and canceled his email account earlier this summer. On his Facebook page, Cooper writes that “some unknown person’s flagging of one image on a ten year-old group-curated page that wasn’t even technically on my blog is the reason they disabled my blog and

Syllabi

Reforming the Racist Criminal Justice System

John MiddletonThroughout the Democratic primaries, police brutality and systematic discrimination in the criminal justice system have become critical campaign issues, due in large part to the unrelenting pressure

Daily Review

American Heiress: The Wild Saga of the Kidnapping, Crimes and Trial of Patty Hearst

As almost anyone over age fifty and almost no one under age thirty will remember, on February 4, 1974, Patricia Hearst was kidnapped from her Berkeley apartment by a small, strange group that called itself the Symbionese Liberation Army. The SLA was less an army than a

Interviews

Jesmyn Ward

James Baldwin's 1963 work, The Fire Next Time, with its forward-glancing title, was the call; The Fire This Time, a collection of essays and poems edited by Jesmyn Ward, is the response. Featuring the work of contemporary, mostly black writers, it finds a way to touch on many subjects.

Video

Lilly Tuck | The Double Life of Liliane

Roundtable

The Art of Advice-Giving

Lidija Haas

Advice is so much more enjoyable to give than it is to receive that its long flourishing as a genre—from the conduct books and periodicals of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries to the current plethora of columns, livechats, and podcasts—could seem mysterious. Of course, watching other people being told what to do might be the most fun of all, which surely helps account for the enduring appeal of the advice column.

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