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Omnivore

Little say over what happens

Jillian J. Jordan, Roseanna Sommers, Paul Bloom, and David G. Rand (Yale): Why Do We Hate Hypocrites? Evidence for a Theory of False Signaling. Cass Sunstein (Harvard): Is Cost-Benefit Analysis a Foreign Language? Against referendums: Referendums give people little say over what happens after the polls close. Obama's only Navy secretary Ray Mabus pushed an agenda of social change — now, he leaves with a warning. The Women's March on Washington has released its platform, and it is unapologetically


Paper Trail

Nobel Prize-winning author Svetlana Alexievich has left Russian PEN. She is joining thirty other writers in protesting PEN’s decision to expel journalist Sergey Parkhomenko after he criticized the group for not supporting a jailed Ukranian filmmaker. In her letter, Alexievich writes that the group’s decision to disavow Parkhomenko is an echo of the Stalinist era.

Syllabi

Shock Waves: A Syllabus for the End Times

Fuck TheoryI'D LIKE TO START WITH A SIMPLE BUT EXPANSIVE ASSERTION: The fundamental epistemological problem of recent intellectual history has been the privileging of contradiction over contrariety. To put it

Daily Review

Jonathan Chait's homage to Obama

In one of the few waggish moments of Audacity: How Barack Obama Defied His Critics and Transformed America (Custom House, $28), Jonathan Chait gently mocks presidential speechwriter Ben Rhodes for having an unrealistic idea of how much text can fit on a bumper sticker.

Interviews

Judith E. Stein

Judith E, Stein's book Eye of the Sixties: Richard Bellamy and the Transformation of Modern Art examines the life of the art dealer who founded the fabled Green Gallery and was an early champion of artists including Mark di Suvero, Claes Oldenburg, James Rosenquist, and Donald Judd

Video

Rain Taxi talks with Kristin Hersh

Roundtable

On Intimate Geometries: The Art and Life of Louise Bourgeois by Robert Storr

Christopher Lyon, Linda Norden, Martha Schwendener, Léa Vuong, and Robert Storr

This 828-page tome on the art and life of Louise Bourgeois, who was born in 1911 and died in 2010, is the product of some thirty years of work. It comprehensively surveys Bourgeois's career as an artist, which spanned nearly seventy-five years, with more than nine hundred illustrations.

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