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Omnivore

Women and the Internet

From The New Yorker, Lizzie Widdicombe on the programmer’s price: The world is being rebuilt in code — now there’s an agency to help top programmers get superstar salaries. Tech is a man’s world: Tech companies may pride themselves on being meritocracies, but unconscious biases shape the way they hire and promote. From Newsweek, Nina Burleigh on what Silicon Valley thinks of women: The sexism in Silicon Valley is sordid, shocking and systemic; it’s going to take a revolution to bring it down


Paper Trail

John Leggett, who directed the Iowa Writers’ Workshop for sixteen years (1971 to 1987), has died at the age of ninety-seven. Among the students he admitted during his long tenure at the program were T. C. Boyle, Michael Cunningham, Denis Johnson, and Jane Smiley. The director of news at Al Jazeera English, Salah Negm, says

Syllabi

Andre Dubus's best characters

Bibi DeitzAndre Dubus's literary superpower is to hit upon that one thing about a character that makes him him, or her her. And in so doing, with subtle, clever details—breadcrumbs on the trail to the nucleus

Daily Review

The Wars of Reconstruction: The Brief, Violent History of America's Most Progressive Era

In the American-history textbook I used in my public high school, the chapter that covered Reconstruction included a photo of Thaddeus Stevens, the nineteenth-century radical Republican congressman from Pennsylvania, who appeared, to judge by the evidence of this

    Interviews

    Miranda July

    In Miranda July's films and short stories, the protagonist is usually shut off from the world: insular, habit-prone, and to the outside world, a little weird, The beauty of Cheryl Glickman, the narrator of July's debut novel, The First Bad Man, is that she's come to see her idiosyncrasies as totally logical, After reading several pages of Cheryl's chatty internal monologue, the reader will, too.

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    Charlie Hebdo, Before the Paris Terror Shooting Attack | Op-Docs

    Appreciation

    On Cortázar

    Becca Rothfeld

    Reading Hopscotch—reading Julio Cortázar—is a bit like navigating a labyrinth. Behind each corner, each chapter doubling back on itself, lurks the prospect of an unforeseen encounter, at once disturbing and tantalizing. Distances are distorted. Ostensible shortcuts will lead you on a scenic route that provides alternate, unexpected perspectives. All the while, Cortázar’s work invokes a sort of Zeno’s Paradox.

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