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Omnivore

The republic of science

Peter Lee (UC-Davis): Democratic Engagement and the Republic of Science. Natalie Ram (Baltimore): Science as Speech. Neil Thompson (MIT) and Douglas Hanley (Pittsburgh): Science is Shaped by Wikipedia: Evidence from a Randomized Control Trial. Nicolas Rougier and John Timmer (Bordeaux): Ten Simple Rules for Scientific Fraud and Misconduct. Darpa wants to build a bs detector for science. What a nerdy debate about p-values shows about science — and how to fix it. The absurdity of the Nobel prizes


Paper Trail

Simeon Booker, reporter and Washington bureau chief for Jet and Ebony, died last weekend at 99 years old. Booker “was the first black reporter to work full-time at the Washington Post and, as a writer at Jet, was one of the first journalists to cover Emmett Till’s murder. Jennifer Szalai has been hired as the

Syllabi

"We Are Revolution": Introducing Asia's Proletarian Lit

Matt TurnerDuring the last election cycle, the American working class got a lot of airplay. Donald Trump’s rhetoric was a throwback to a different era of politics and a different economy. Talk of American workers

Daily Review

The Kingdom

"The Kingdom" is a weird, brilliant hybrid of biblical interpretation, memoir, and historical fiction in which the author speculates about the personalities of the earliest Christians. The book is brash in its structure, tone, and some of its claims. But Carrère isn’t doing anything that Christians haven't been doing for two millennia. He’s just doing it an in a wildly contemporary, self-conscious way.

Interviews

Tony Tulathimutte and Malcolm Harris

I met author Tony Tulathimutte at a reading in Manhattan where he asked the audience to vote on which section of his novel Private Citizens to read from: the one on writer’s workshops or the one on pornography. Porn won, and Tony delivered a complex, funny, and disturbing passage. Later, when I saw his blurb recommending Malcolm Harris’s new study, Kids These Days: Human Capital and the Making of Millennials, I read the book and was impressed by its sweeping socio-economic critique.

Video

Bookforum: “False Starts”

Conversation

A Broken Story: Jenny Erpenbeck's Refugee Novel

John Domini

Overseas, Jenny Erpenbeck’s latest novel has carried her to fresh levels of acclaim. She’s won not only the Thomas Mann Prize, in her native Germany, but also Italy’s Strega Europeo, something of a Booker for the Continent. Now the book is out in this country, under the title Go, Went, Gone, and though Erpenbeck’s four previous have won critical esteem—the New York Review of Books deemed her last novel “ferocious as well as virtuosic”—here,

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