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Omnivore

The German elections are not boring

Here’s why you should pay attention to this weekend’s German election. The German elections are not boring — they are troubling. Merkel’s legacy: As Germany prepares to head to the polls, the chancellor’s exhausted, Europe’s in shambles, and a neo-Nazi party is on the rise. These young German voters explain why Angela Merkel is on course for a fourth term as chancellor. The Angela Merkel model — or how to succeed in German politics. The German Left is its own worst enemy: Could Germany’s left-wing


Paper Trail

Orion is publishing an anthology about Brexit this November. Goodbye, Europe, will include works from forty-six contributors, including a short story by Lionel Shriver “about a relationship ending in the wake of the referendum,” a reflection by Jessie Burton “about her first visit to the continent,” and an essay by Robert MacFarlane “about the flight

Syllabi

Women in Rock (Criticism)

Quinn Moreland Rock criticism has long been kind to a certain species of (male) character: wannabe experts who are prone to ranting and/or raving and proudly displaying their knowledge of niche subjects. It’s hard

Daily Review

Alice’s Restaurant

In 1979, Werner Herzog made good on a promise to eat his shoe. A few years earlier, Errol Morris, a protégé of Herzog’s in Berkeley, California, had been struggling to finish his first film. Herzog promised that if Morris got it done, he’d consume some footwear. Morris

Interviews

Lucy Ives

Lucy Ives was supposed to be writing her dissertation when Stella Krakus, the main character in Ives’s debut novel, Impossible Views of the World, came into her mind, It would take six years for Stella to fully emerge, but when she did, she brought an unlikely triumvirate of irrepressible qualities: a nerd’s expertise in maps and early Americana, a kooky and misanthropic sense of self, and a gimlet eye for the art world in which she seems surprised to have found herself.

Conversation

A Broken Story: Jenny Erpenbeck's Refugee Novel

John Domini

Overseas, Jenny Erpenbeck’s latest novel has carried her to fresh levels of acclaim. She’s won not only the Thomas Mann Prize, in her native Germany, but also Italy’s Strega Europeo, something of a Booker for the Continent. Now the book is out in this country, under the title Go, Went, Gone, and though Erpenbeck’s four previous have won critical esteem—the New York Review of Books deemed her last novel “ferocious as well as virtuosic”—here,

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