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Omnivore

Of religious identity

A new issue of the International Journal of Religious Tourism and Pilgrimage is out. Thea Rae Maggard (GTU): Queering Trans(theo)phobia: A Comparative Analysis between Jodo Shinshu Buddhism and Roman Catholicism on Transgender Issues. Pazit Ben-Nun Bloom (HUJI), Gizem Arikan (Yasar), and Marie Courtemanche (Thiel): Religious Social Identity, Religious Belief, and Anti-Immigration Sentiment. Scott McLemee reviews The Bhagavad Gita: A Biography by Richard H. Davis. Hershey H. Friedman (Brooklyn)


Paper Trail

Rhapsody, says the New York Times, is not just an airline magazine but a “lofty” literary journal. “An airline might seem like an odd literary patron,” the article claims. “But as publishers and writers look for new ways to reach readers in a shaky retail climate, many have formed corporate alliances with transit companies, including

Syllabi

The Nicholson Baker Course

J.C. HallmanWhen I starting reading Nicholson Baker, so as to write my homage, B & Me: A True Story of Literary Arousal, I quickly grew concerned, because Baker's many writerly interests got all jumbled up in my

Daily Review

It Starts with Trouble: William Goyen and the Life of Writing

The piney backwoods of East Texas might be the unlikeliest place on earth to produce a writer like William Goyen. He escaped via the navy, and he might have easily become an artist who left home and never looked back. Instead, that "bewitched" landscape loomed large. "All serious art celebrates mystery, perhaps," Joyce Carol Oates once wrote, "but Goyen's comes close to embodying it."

Interviews

Sarah Manguso

Sarah Manguso's latest book, Ongoingness: The End of a Diary, ostensibly about the eight-hundred-thousand-word journal she kept for twenty-five years, is in essence an act of withholding. On most pages, a few paragraphs or lines of text are surrounded by white space—precise moments suspended in the mass of formless, unrecorded time.

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Judith Butler on Demonstrating Precarity

Essay

Dennis Cooper's Haunted HTML Novel

Paige K. Bradley

You could call Dennis Cooper's new HTML novel, Zac’s Haunted House, many things: net art, a glorified Tumblr, a visual novel, a mood board, or a dark night of the Internet's soul. It has just a few words—the chapter titles and a few subtitles embedded in some of the gifs—but it still very clearly belongs to Cooper’s own haunted oeuvre, capable of evoking powerful and gnarled emotions.

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