Our relationship with work

Ewan McGaughey (King’s): A Human Is Not a Resource. The quitting economy: When employees are treated as short-term assets, they reinvent themselves as marketable goods, always ready to quit. Downward-facing capitalist dogma: Office wellbeing programs disguise companies’ base motivations with the language of care. Racial divides have been holding American workers back for more than a century. Monopolies may be worse for workers than for consumers. The new working class: It’s not just men working

Paper Trail

At the Paris Review, Chris Kraus and Leslie Jamison discuss recovery, addiction narratives, and Jamison’s latest book, The Recovering. “So much of the book is a fight against exceptionalism,” Jamison said. “The idea that a story has to be ‘exceptional’ in order to be worth telling is curious to me. What if we looked at


Marriage Reimagined

Laura SmithIt is easy to view the vast and varied landscape of marriage in the present day as a radical departure from a more conservative past. But many of these marriage alternatives—including polyamory, open

Daily Review

The Sparsholt Affair

A fan of Alan Hollinghurst’s masterpiece The Line of Beauty has created a Twitter account, @lollinghurst, to document the many epigrams and sly jokes and thrillingly acute descriptions found throughout that novel. These “lines of beauty” don’t just serve to decorate the


Jenn Pelly

“The Raincoats were a group of women who were, in part, just learning to play their instruments, but their debut album also coincides with the start of a whole artistic sensibility, one of fearless and knowing amateurism,” Pitchfork contributing editor Jenn Pelly writes in her recent book about the origins of the Raincoats, part of Bloomsbury’s 33 1/3 music writing series.


Minds of the Immortals: Emily Wilson on translating "The Odyssey"

Ben Shields

“The minds of the immortals rarely change,” old King Nestor tells Telemachus in Book III of The Odyssey, That may be true, but the ways that we experience and imagine those gods change regularly, Since the sixteenth century, dozens of English-language translators have traversed the epics of archaic Hellas, and all of them have returned with their own unique account: Blank verse, couplets, and prose are all available portals into Homer.