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Omnivore

Have it both ways

Cass Sunstein (Harvard): “They Ruined Popcorn”: On the Costs and Benefits of Mandatory Labels. U.S. tells Puerto Rico it’s not broke enough to get loans. Trump slashes crucial funding for hurricane-ravaged Puerto Rico. The Turpins won’t be the last: Sarah Jones on how lax homeschooling laws protect child abusers. Josh Marshall on the most important lesson and message and story of Michael Wolff’s book. Howard Kurtz’s new book, Media Madness: Donald Trump, the Press, and the War Over the Truth,


Paper Trail

The finalists for the 2017 National Book Critics Circle Awards and the winners of the John Leonard Prize and the Ivan Sandrof Lifetime Achievement Award have been announced. John McPhee has won the Lifetime Achievement Award, while Carmen Maria Machado’s Her Body and Other Parties has won the John Leonard Prize. Award nominees include Masha

Syllabi

"We Are Revolution": Introducing Asia's Proletarian Lit

Matt TurnerDuring the last election cycle, the American working class got a lot of airplay. Donald Trump’s rhetoric was a throwback to a different era of politics and a different economy. Talk of American workers

Daily Review

The Years

“I have always wanted to write the sort of book that I find it impossible to talk about afterward, the sort of book that makes it impossible for me to withstand the gaze of others,” writes Annie Ernaux’s narrator near the end of her 1998 autofiction, Shame. Ernaux takes

Interviews

Tony Tulathimutte and Malcolm Harris

I met author Tony Tulathimutte at a reading in Manhattan where he asked the audience to vote on which section of his novel Private Citizens to read from: the one on writer’s workshops or the one on pornography. Porn won, and Tony delivered a complex, funny, and disturbing passage. Later, when I saw his blurb recommending Malcolm Harris’s new study, Kids These Days: Human Capital and the Making of Millennials, I read the book and was impressed by its sweeping socio-economic critique.

Conversation

Minds of the Immortals: Emily Wilson on translating "The Odyssey"

Ben Shields

“The minds of the immortals rarely change,” old King Nestor tells Telemachus in Book III of The Odyssey, That may be true, but the ways that we experience and imagine those gods change regularly, Since the sixteenth century, dozens of English-language translators have traversed the epics of archaic Hellas, and all of them have returned with their own unique account: Blank verse, couplets, and prose are all available portals into Homer.

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