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Omnivore

Donald Trump poisons everything

For Trump, “consequences are piling up” in Washington. “He is failing”: Trump strikes out solo as friends worry and enemies circle. Thread: “He’s an utter failure as president, and he clearly knows it, so he’s lashing out and breaking things just because he can”. Trump keeps getting mad when he finds out what his policies actually do: “But like the millions of low-information voters who elected him, Trump was duped by Fox News”. Inside the “adult day-care center”: How aides try to control and


Paper Trail

George Saunders has won the Man Booker prize for his first novel, Lincoln in the Bardo. The Guardian’s Justine Jordan writes that while the decision to give the award to two Americans in a row might bother some, Saunders’s book was the right choice for this year. “At a time when America is notably divided,

Syllabi

Women in Rock (Criticism)

Quinn Moreland Rock criticism has long been kind to a certain species of (male) character: wannabe experts who are prone to ranting and/or raving and proudly displaying their knowledge of niche subjects. It’s hard

Daily Review

A View of Her Own

Beginning the second paragraph of her 1973 essay on Virginia Woolf and the Bloomsbury set, published in the New York Review of Books, which she cofounded, Elizabeth Hardwick had a line on the lesser members of that mutual entourage: “Certain peripheral names vex the spirits.”

Interviews

Andrew Durbin

Over the past few years, I’ve heard Andrew Durbin read a handful of times from material that would comprise his debut novel, MacArthur Park, Blushing, he’d rush through the reading, his anxious timbre at odds with the confidently intelligent voice of his prose

Video

Bookforum: “False Starts”

Conversation

A Broken Story: Jenny Erpenbeck's Refugee Novel

John Domini

Overseas, Jenny Erpenbeck’s latest novel has carried her to fresh levels of acclaim. She’s won not only the Thomas Mann Prize, in her native Germany, but also Italy’s Strega Europeo, something of a Booker for the Continent. Now the book is out in this country, under the title Go, Went, Gone, and though Erpenbeck’s four previous have won critical esteem—the New York Review of Books deemed her last novel “ferocious as well as virtuosic”—here,

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