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Omnivore

Of modern Biblical studies

Randall S. Firestone (El Camino): Why the Bible Cannot and Should Not Be Taken Literally. Jeffrey L. Morrow (Seton Hall): Secularization, Objectivity, and Enlightenment Scholarship: The Theological and Political Origins of Modern Biblical Studies. Ibrahim Abraham (Helsinki): Would you Adam and Eve it? Social Scientific Contributions to the Study of the Reception of Scripture in Consumer Society. Hershey H. Friedman (Brooklyn) and Linda Weiser Friedman (Baruch): Is Greed Good? Lessons About Moral


Paper Trail

The Washington Post‘s Tehran correspondent Jason Rezaian, who’s been in prison in Iran since July, is now facing formal charges, including espionage. Pulitzers were just announced—winners include Elizabeth Kolbert for The Sixth Extinction and Anthony Doerr for All the Light We Cannot See. Michael Eric Dyson has attempted a demolition job on Cornel West in

Syllabi

Women on Women in Love

Phyllis Fong Strangely enough, until now, Patricia Highsmith's 1952 The Price of Salt has never had a proper film treatment. Announced at this year's Cannes festival, the long-waited-for adaptation, directed by

Daily Review

Neoliberalizing Liberal Education

A good liberal education has three dimensions—learning, teaching, and citizenship building—each of which the journalist Fareed Zakaria has mishandled enough in his own academic career so that he misrepresents them for the rest of us in In Defense of a Liberal Education. I review that book in Bookforum’s summer issue, but before the predictable coronation gets too far along, here

Interviews

Sarah Manguso

Sarah Manguso's latest book, Ongoingness: The End of a Diary, ostensibly about the eight-hundred-thousand-word journal she kept for twenty-five years, is in essence an act of withholding. On most pages, a few paragraphs or lines of text are surrounded by white space—precise moments suspended in the mass of formless, unrecorded time.

Essay

Dennis Cooper's Haunted HTML Novel

Paige K. Bradley

You could call Dennis Cooper's new HTML novel, Zac’s Haunted House, many things: net art, a glorified Tumblr, a visual novel, a mood board, or a dark night of the Internet's soul. It has just a few words—the chapter titles and a few subtitles embedded in some of the gifs—but it still very clearly belongs to Cooper’s own haunted oeuvre, capable of evoking powerful and gnarled emotions.

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