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Omnivore

Behind the push for an immigration overhaul

Moria Paz (Stanford): Human Rights, Immigration, and Border Walls. Kieran Oberman (Edinburgh): Immigration and Equal Ownership of the Earth. Eric A. Posner and Glen Weyl on a radical solution to global income inequality: Make the U.S. more like Qatar by having open migration laws that are coupled, paradoxically, with caste systems. Kristina Shull (USC): “Nobody Wants These People”: Reagan’s Immigration Crisis and the Containment of Foreign Bodies. Steve Striffler (UNO): The Left, Labour, and the


Paper Trail

Daniel Handler made some flat-footed and racist jokes while hosting Wednesday’s National Book Awards event. It’s no fun to watch. He apologized yesterday on Twitter, but the bad taste lingers. As Roxane Gay put it: “It’s not one off color joke, it’s the sum of all of them, everywhere, from the people you are most

Syllabi

Andre Dubus's best characters

Bibi DeitzAndre Dubus's literary superpower is to hit upon that one thing about a character that makes him him, or her her. And in so doing, with subtle, clever details—breadcrumbs on the trail to the nucleus

Daily Review

Repast Imperfect

In tales of domestic life, which is what Laurie Colwin's are (in the best sense of that tradition), the day-to-day particulars provide all the depth. Colwin's writing provides a gentle entrance into the inevitable understanding that no matter how delicious the food or heavy the silver, there's usually something nasty, or at least hard to see, lurking under the table.

Interviews

Dodie Bellamy

Dodie Bellamy's most recent book, The TV Sutras, is a personal meditation on religious experience, as well as what it means to be a teacher and to be taught.

Excerpt

A Store of Half-Knowledge

Charles D'Ambrosio

The essay, at its best, is a genre shaped by the character of its author. Charles D’Ambrosio describes it as “a forum for self-doubt.” The author’s irresolution runs throughout Loitering, his new collection. “We are more intimately bound to one another by our kindred doubts than our brave conclusions,” he notes. By communicating uncertainty, D’Ambrosio eases its isolation.

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