Advertisement

Omnivore

One little thing

Don Waisanen (Baruch): Comedian-in-Chief: Presidential Jokes as Enthymematic Crisis Rhetoric. The joke was that Obama wasn’t joking. Nikita Dhawan on rescuing the Enlightenment from the Europeans: The Enlightenment ideals of cosmopolitanism and hospitality are nowhere to be found in today’s European border policy — the escalating migrant crisis makes this clearer than ever. Aid groups knew a Nepal earthquake would be a disaster — but they couldn’t raise enough money to help. The virtual


Paper Trail

The Wire’s David Simon spoke up on his website about events in Baltimore, where the National Guard was called out and a curfew declared after anger surged in response to yet another death in police custody (Freddie Gray’s funeral took place yesterday). Ta-Nehisi Coates saw the situation very differently: “When nonviolence is preached as an

Syllabi

Hobo Lit

Michael Sandlin America's attitudes toward its most destitute citizens have always been sharply polarized. Consider, for instance, the philosophical divide between Emerson's uncharitable self-reliance ("Are they my

Daily Review

The Fine Art of Fucking Up

Is the phrase "a farce set in art school" redundant? Cate Dicharry's first novel takes that view, and while this position could easily be insufferable as well as unnecessary—hitting the broad side of a barn is not exactly a daring challenge—she makes it an unvarnished delight. This is an especially wise authorial move given how well-worked a genre the campus novel is—and how brave or even foolhardy it is to follow the likes of Kingsley Amis, Mary McCarthy, and Randall Jarrell.

Interviews

Sarah Manguso

Sarah Manguso's latest book, Ongoingness: The End of a Diary, ostensibly about the eight-hundred-thousand-word journal she kept for twenty-five years, is in essence an act of withholding. On most pages, a few paragraphs or lines of text are surrounded by white space—precise moments suspended in the mass of formless, unrecorded time.

Essay

Dennis Cooper's Haunted HTML Novel

Paige K. Bradley

You could call Dennis Cooper's new HTML novel, Zac’s Haunted House, many things: net art, a glorified Tumblr, a visual novel, a mood board, or a dark night of the Internet's soul. It has just a few words—the chapter titles and a few subtitles embedded in some of the gifs—but it still very clearly belongs to Cooper’s own haunted oeuvre, capable of evoking powerful and gnarled emotions.

Advertisement