Becoming more like it

Alessandro Roncaglia (Rome): Oil and its Markets. Ana Swanson on the surprising way the world is becoming more like it was a thousand years ago. Betty Boyd Caroli on why we should pay more attention to the candidates’ spouses — they have more power than we realize. Lawrence Lessig: “I’m trying to run for president, but the Democrats won’t let me”. Aides find Ben Carson’s inflammatory remarks are helping him. Rightbloggers rally around Ben Carson, which means he’s probably over. Kate Knibbs on

Paper Trail

The winner of this year’s Booker Prize will be announced in a few hours’ time—meanwhile, you can hear from both the candidates and the judges. For T magazine, Rachel Kushner goes to Santa Cruz for a conversation with her friend Jonathan Franzen (whom, “for the record,” she considers “principally a comic writer”) about Edward Snowden,


Sex and Hysteria in the 1980s

Richard BeckIn the 1980s, an idea took hold throughout the US that very young children existed in a near-constant state of sexual danger. A moral panic ensued, in which many day-care workers were wrongly accused

Daily Review

Fat City

In a recent T: The New York Times Style Magazine story extolling the virtues of boxing films (classic and contemporary), Benjamin Nugent points out that every example of the genre involves a comeback, against all odds. The protagonist pulls off an upset victory in the ring and lives to fight another day.


Sylvère Lotringer

Few people can be said to have singlehandedly introduced a new body of thought to a foreign country, but that is precisely what the critic, professor, and Semiotext(e) founder Sylvère Lotringer did throughout the 1970s and '80s.


Claudia A Banks for the Banned Books Week 2015 Virtual Read Out!


The Banality of Optimism

Terry Eagleton

Nations, like political creeds, can be upbeat or downbeat. Along with North Korea, the United States is one of the few countries on earth in which optimism is almost a state ideology. For large sectors of the nation, to be bullish is to be patriotic, while negativity is a species of thought crime.