What makes a terrorist?

Iain Edgar (Durham): Dreams of Islamic State. A report finds ISIS has recruited as many as 30,000 foreigners in the past year. Michael Weiss on how ISIS picks its suicide bombers: They come from Russia, France — even New Jersey — to end their lives for an “Islamic State”. Michael Petrou on how an America-loving country became a jihadi hub: Kosovo owes its existence to the West; its capital even has a statue of Bill Clinton — but even here, Islamic State is taking root. James Harkin on how ISIS

Paper Trail

Thanksgiving week seems an especially appropriate time to think about citizenship (e.g. Sarah Matthews on what it takes to get a green card), statelessness (e.g. an interview with Atossa Araxia Abrahamian about her intriguing new book The Cosmopolites), migration, and refugees. The last word should perhaps go to John Oliver, from his final show of


Southern Comedy

Margaret EbyWhen it comes to literature, the word southern practically begs for the follow-up gothic. A certain set of tropes spring to mind when you mention the South: alligators and frosted julep cups, hypocritical

Daily Review

The Darkness Show: On Jokes and Terror in Paris

I don't know if other people are admitting this, but at first we made jokes. Other people were laughing, too—I could see them in the café, waving it away—but I don't suppose we're to speak of that now, for the dead are sacred, and sacred isn't funny. Which is another one of terrorism's many little victories since November 13: We're all one step further away from funny. Not real wit—there's always room for that—but dumb, deflecting humor.


Carrie Brownstein

From the opening pages of Hunger Makes Me a Modern Girl, it's clear that Carrie Brownstein, best known as a guitarist and singer in the seminal band Sleater-Kinney, and now as an actor and the cowriter and star of Portlandia, is a writer first.


Inventing the Future: Postcapitalism and a World Without Work

Nick Srnicek and Alex Williams

Work has become central to our very self-conception—so much so that when presented with the idea of doing less work, many people ask, "But what would I do?" The fact that so many people find it impossible to imagine a meaningful life outside of work demonstrates the extent to which the work ethic has infected our minds.