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Omnivore

Time will not disappear

Charles Yuji Horioka (Philippines): The Life and Work of Martin Stuart (“Marty”) Feldstein. Nancy Morawetz (NYU) and Natasha J. Silber (WLRK): Immigration Law and the Myth of Comprehensive Registration. Matt Eller (Syracuse): On Fat Oppression. Jonathan Gershuny and Kimberly Fisher (Oxford): Post-industrious Society: Why Work Time Will not Disappear for Our Grandchildren. Julian Davis Mortenson (Michigan): When May the Executive Break the Law? A Theory of Republican Prerogative. Jody Freeman (


Paper Trail

An interactive graph allows you to track the usage of particular words in New York Times articles over time. “Famously,” for example, appeared in five articles in 1966 and 1332 articles in 2012. Gawker lists the ten “worst New Yorker ‘longreads’”: among them, Adam Gopnik on baking bread; Tad Friend on apartment-hunting; Anthony Lane on

Syllabi

Weird Sex

Vanessa RovetoThere's good sex and there's bad sex. And then there's weird sex—a Freudian purgatory that somehow neither stimulates the libido nor inhibits it. In art and life, we're inclined to seek out pleasure

Daily Review

Excellent Sheep: The Miseducation of the American Elite and the Way to a Meaningful Life

William Deresiewicz begins his blistering, arm-waving jeremiad against Ivy League colleges and their dozens of emulators, which are creating a caste that is ruining itself and society, with the insistence that the book is a letter to his twenty-year-old self.

Interviews

William T. Vollmann

William T. Vollmann's latest story collection considers death from a variety of perspectives, veering from realistic to supernatural, from reportage-like writing to the ghost story. Bookforum talks with the author about his new book, his FBI files, his ongoing research of coal mines and the environment, and his female persona, Delores.

Excerpt

An Air of Impoverishment and Depleted Humanity

Amanda Petrusich

In Do Not Sell at Any Price, Amanda Petrusich visits the secretive, insular world of 78rpm collectors. The oldest version of the record, these 10-inch, two-song albums are increasingly hard to track down. Finding a matching turntable is a feat in itself. The scarcity has kept the number of hobbyists small, and their devotion to “the treasure hunt” fanatical. As Petrusich explains, her interest in 78s began as a nostalgic protest

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