• Sam Ross and Edgar Kunz (PRINCE STREET)

    Tap Out, Edgar Kunz’s debut collection, reckons with working‑class heritage. Approach these poems as short stories, plainspoken lyric essays, controlled arcs of a bildungsroman, then again as narrative verse. Within are poignant, troubling portraits of blue‑collar lives, mental health in contemporary…

    Tap Out, Edgar Kunz’s debut collection, reckons with working‑class heritage. Approach these poems as short stories, plainspoken lyric essays, controlled arcs of a bildungsroman, then again as narrative verse. Within are poignant, troubling portraits of blue‑collar lives, mental health in contemporary America, and what is conveyed and passed on through touch and words―violent, or simply absent. This hungry new voice asks: after you make the choice to leave, what is left behind, what can you make of it, and at what cost?

    Sam Ross' Company is the winner of the Four Way Books Levis Prize in Poetry. Ross’s poems are at once earthy and delicate and view their subjects through a perceptive, picaresque lens. Carl Phillips writes of these poems: "Ross pitches nothing less than stubborn belief in tenderness and in the patience both to look everywhere for it and to trustingly wait for it ('I would learn rare//and love and want and wait./I had to start at the beginning.') This a debut both tough and tender, the poems of a man who's been made to look away from the world plenty, and has found a way to look steadily back."

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  • The New Me: Halle Butler (PRINCE STREET)

    “A dark comedy of female rage” (Catherine Lacey) and a biting satire of life in the American workforce from a National Book Foundation “5 Under 35” honoree and Granta Best Young American Novelist “[The New Me] dives deep into the idea of millennial burnout. . . Many readers will identify with Butler’s…

    “A dark comedy of female rage” (Catherine Lacey) and a biting satire of life in the American workforce from a National Book Foundation “5 Under 35” honoree and Granta Best Young American Novelist

    “[The New Me] dives deep into the idea of millennial burnout. . . Many readers will identify with Butler’s psychologically astute yet somewhat hopeless inner monologue.” –Mind Body Green

    I’m still trying to make the dream possible: still might finish my cleaning project, still might sign up for that yoga class, still might, still might. I step into the shower and almost faint, an image of taking the day by the throat and bashing its head against the wall floating in my mind.

    Thirty-year-old Millie just can’t pull it together. She spends her days working a thankless temp job and her nights alone in her apartment, fixating on all the ways she might change her situation–her job, her attitude, her appearance, her life. Then she watches TV until she falls asleep, and the cycle begins again.

    When the possibility of a full-time job offer arises, it seems to bring the better life she’s envisioning within reach. But with it also comes the paralyzing realization, lurking just beneath the surface, of how hollow that vision has become.

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  • Disquieting: Cynthia Cruz (PRINCE STREET)

    Disquieting: Essays on Silence by Cynthia Cruz is a book of silence and turning away. In these essays, Cruz asks how can we live lives of resistance to the desires and ideologies of contemporary Neoliberal culture. Tarrying with those who turn away, she inhabits connections between mental illness, …

    Disquieting: Essays on Silence by Cynthia Cruz is a book of silence and turning away. In these essays, Cruz asks how can we live lives of resistance to the desires and ideologies of contemporary Neoliberal culture. Tarrying with those who turn away, she inhabits connections between mental illness, anorexia, refusal, silence and Neoliberalism. She explores the experience of being working-class and poor in contemporary culture, and how those who are silenced often turn to forms of disquietude that value open-endedness, complexity, and difficulty. Disquieting draws on philosophy, theory, art, film, and literature to offer alternative ways of being in this world and possibilities for building a new one.

    Cynthia Cruz is the author of five collections of poems: How the End Begins, Wunderkammer, The Glimmering Room, and Ruin. Her fifth collection of poems, Dregs, was published in September of 2018. The editor of a forthcoming anthology of contemporary Latina poetry, Other Musics: New Latina Poetry (2019), Disquieting:Essays on Silence is her first collection of essays. Cruz is the recipient of fellowships from Yaddo, the MacDowell Colony, and a Hodder fellowship from Princeton University. She teaches at Sarah Lawrence College and Columbia University.

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