• s

  • m

  • t

  • w

  • h

  • f

  • s



The Drawing Center

35 Wooster Street, New York, NY 10013

    • Bellwethers: The Culture of Controversy

      With Chiara Bottici, Sam McKinniss, Adrian Matejka, and Audrey Wollen From those written by the Futurists to the Surrealists, from the Black Panthers to the Unabomber, the manifesto remains a charismatic genre that persists despite the waning of utopic politics and unified avant-garde movements. This…

      With Chiara Bottici, Sam McKinniss, Adrian Matejka, and Audrey Wollen

      From those written by the Futurists to the Surrealists, from the Black Panthers to the Unabomber, the manifesto remains a charismatic genre that persists despite the waning of utopic politics and unified avant-garde movements. This session invites contributors to engage with this form and its myriad applications as a: call to action, theatrical exercise, prescriptive fiction, or a platform for extremist philosophizing, or paradoxical pontification.

      Chiara Bottici

      Associate Professor of Philosophy at the New School for Social Research. Professor Bottici has written on myth, imagination, ancient and early modern philosophy, the Frankfurt School, psychoanalysis, feminism, contemporary social and political philosophy. She is currently at work on a book on Anarcha-feminism.

      
Sam McKinniss

      Artist and writer based in New York. McKinniss’s writing is regularly published in Artforum. His manifesto will address how an artist should be.

      Adrian Matejka

      Adrian Matejka is the author of The Devil’s Garden (2003) and Mixology (2009). His third collection of poems, The Big Smoke (2013), was a finalist for the 2014 Pulitzer Prize. His most recent poetry book (Map to the Stars), was published in 2017. Among Matejka’s other honors are a Pushcart Prize, and fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the Lannan Foundation, the National Endowment for the Arts, and a Simon Fellowship from United States Artists. He is the Ruth Lilly Professor of Poetry at Indiana University Bloomington and currently serves as Poet Laureate for the state of Indiana.

      Audrey Wollen

      Writer and artist who lives in New York. Most recently, Wollen’s artwork has appeared at the Museum of Modern Art Warsaw, Barischer Kunstverein, Karlsruhe, the Washington Square Windows at 80wse gallery, New York, as well as in a one artist exhibition at Steve Turner Gallery, Los Angeles. Her critical writing has appeared and is forthcoming in Affidavit, The Nation, and Bookforum. She is currently pursuing a PhD at The Graduate Center, CUNY. She will present a manifesto on men.

      MORE ABOUT THIS EVENT
    • PANIC

      PANIC With Andrea Long Chu and Jamieson Webster “Panic” is a pervasive, if abused term used to describe our reaction to our contemporary landscape and is affixed to any number of issues: gender identity, border, climate, globalism, Brexit, Trump, and Russia. Our current Age of Anxiety is super …

      PANIC

      With Andrea Long Chu and Jamieson Webster

      “Panic” is a pervasive, if abused term used to describe our reaction to our contemporary landscape and is affixed to any number of issues: gender identity, border, climate, globalism, Brexit, Trump, and Russia. Our current Age of Anxiety is super charged by the 24-7 newstainment cycle, designed to keep us flickering through states of hysteria and scandal, worry and outrage. Is there any relief for this panic? How does this time relate to other periods of collective hysteria?

      Andrea Long Chu

      Writer, designer, doctoral candidate, and sad trans girl in Brooklyn. Chu’s writing has been published by the New York Times, Affidavit, Artforum, Bookforum, and n+1. She also publishes a monthly journal on television called Paper View. Her first book Females will be published by Verso this October.

      Jamieson Webster

      Psychoanalyst and cultural critic based in New York. Weber is the author of The Life and Death of Psychoanalysis (2011) and Conversion Disorder: Listening to the Body in Psychoanalysis (2018); she also co-wrote, with Simon Critchley, Stay, Illusion! The Hamlet Doctrine (2013). She teaches at the New School and supervises doctoral students in clinical psychology at the City University of New York. She co-writes a regular column for Spike with Alison Gingeras.

      MORE ABOUT THIS EVENT
    • CANCELLATION

      With Anna Khachiyan and Natasha Stagg Forget the old style of enforcing political correctness—the new culture of cancellation is socially swift and unilaterally unpredictable. On the one hand, “cancel culture” has been used to swiftly punish perceived criminal behavior; on the flip side, it can …

      With Anna Khachiyan and Natasha Stagg

      Forget the old style of enforcing political correctness—the new culture of cancellation is socially swift and unilaterally unpredictable. On the one hand, “cancel culture” has been used to swiftly punish perceived criminal behavior; on the flip side, it can operate as a means to extinguish nuanced debate and cast out public figures in trials by Twitter. How do we navigate this phenomenon, which some see as inherently undemocratic and anti-nuanced, while others praise as effective in a world in which the law is statistically proven to fail women and people of color? How does cancellation impact revisionist artistic and political histories?

      Anna Khachiyan

      Writer based in New York. Khachiyan is co-host of the podcast Red Scare, and an occasional art critic. She was “cancelled” by Twitter in 2018 due to her polemical commentaries, and is a leading voice on the millennial left.

      Natasha Stagg

      Writer based in New York. Stagg’s work has appeared in Affidavit, Artforum, Bookforum, The Brooklyn Rail, CR Fashion Book, DIS Magazine, n+1, The Paris Review, Spike Art Quarterly, among many other publications. Stagg’s debut novel Surveys was published by Semiotext(e)/Native Agents in 2016, and her book of critical essays, published by Semiotext (e) will be published later this year.

      MORE ABOUT THIS EVENT
    Advertisement