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Omnivore

The advice everyone is giving Democrats

Future of the Party: Here is a new report making the case for a progressive Democratic party. The Left needs to battle for democracy as viciously as the fight fights for power: Joshua Holland interviews David Faris, author of It’s Time to Fight Dirty: How Democrats Can Build a Lasting Majority in American Politics. Progressivism as a brand: Beware candidates who have suddenly discovered that they support left-wing goals. De Leon vs Feinstein, Cuomo vs Nixon highlight a crossroads for labor and


Paper Trail

Time has released its annual 100 Most Influential List. This year, each honoree’s blurb was written by another influential person—Barack Obama wrote about the Parkland students, Mindy Kaling wrote on Issa Rae, and Lee Daniels wrote about Jesmyn Ward. But, as GQ’s Jay Willis notes, “the brand of praise bestowed upon a given cultural luminary

Syllabi

Marriage Reimagined

Laura SmithIt is easy to view the vast and varied landscape of marriage in the present day as a radical departure from a more conservative past. But many of these marriage alternatives—including polyamory, open

Daily Review

Power Trip

Tao Lin’s eighth book, Trip, is his best yet, and it’s all thanks to drugs. Well, perhaps not entirely thanks to drugs. With exercise comes mastery, or at least competence, and Lin has been practicing his idiosyncratic craft for over a decade.

Interviews

Wayne Koestenbaum

Ludwig Wittgenstein noted that in representational writing, “one thinks that one is tracing the outline of the thing’s nature . . . and one is merely tracing round the frame through which we look at it.” In Wayne Koestenbaum’s “trance journals”—The Pink Trance Notebooks (2015) and the newly released Camp Marmalade—both the frame and the off-frame are folded into his trans-perspectival impressions.

Essay

A Poet of the Archives: On Susan Howe

Emily LaBarge

Howe has long been interested in distilling signs and symbols, whether “art objects” or words themselves, into something more revelatory. Considering riddles, lost languages, doubled surfaces, spells, magical thinking, and other elusive forms of expression, Howe sounds the depths.

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