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Omnivore

Facebook’s data scandal

“I’m not familiar with that”: The five most dishonest answers Mark Zuckerberg gave to Congress. Why dictators love Facebook: The social media network lives according to double standards. Facebook doesn’t need to listen through your microphone to serve you creepy ads. Facebook uses artificial intelligence to predict your future actions for advertisers, says confidential document. We may own our data, but Facebook has a duty to protect it. Why Facebook’s data scandal has not become a wider crisis:


Paper Trail

Parkland shooting survivors and siblings David Hogg and Lauren Hogg are writing a book with Random House. #NeverAgain, which includes a foreword by Parkland student Emma González, will detail the movement’s purpose and challenges as they attempt to convince lawmakers to enact new gun control legislation. #NeverAgain will be published in June. The shortlist for

Syllabi

Marriage Reimagined

Laura SmithIt is easy to view the vast and varied landscape of marriage in the present day as a radical departure from a more conservative past. But many of these marriage alternatives—including polyamory, open

Daily Review

The Burning House: Jim Crow and the Making of Modern America

In 1977, the school district of Kansas City, Missouri, sued the state of Missouri for supporting segregation. Kansas City students were largely black; suburban schools educated significantly whiter populations. The government’s districting policies, the suit alleged,

Interviews

Wayne Koetenbaum

Ludwig Wittgenstein noted that in representational writing, “one thinks that one is tracing the outline of the thing’s nature . . . and one is merely tracing round the frame through which we look at it.” In Wayne Koestenbaum’s “trance journals”—The Pink Trance Notebooks (2015) and the newly released Camp Marmalade—both the frame and the off-frame are folded into his trans-perspectival impressions.

Video

Bookforum: "Bleeding Hearts"

Essay

A Poet of the Archives: On Susan Howe

Emily LaBarge

Howe has long been interested in distilling signs and symbols, whether “art objects” or words themselves, into something more revelatory. Considering riddles, lost languages, doubled surfaces, spells, magical thinking, and other elusive forms of expression, Howe sounds the depths.

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