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Omnivore

What fake news really is

Romy Jaster (Berlin) and David Lanius (KIT): What is Fake News? Axel Gelfert (TU Berlin): Fake News: A Definition. Lili Levi (Miami): Real “Fake News” and Fake “Fake News”. Philosophers on fake news: Haeun Kim on Arendt and Foucault on power and truth in media politics. Robert B. Talisse on how there’s no such thing as fake news (and that’s bad news). Joshua Habgood-Coote (Bristol): Stop Talking about Fake News! Ari Ezra Waldman (NYLS): The Marketplace of Fake News. Matteo Monti (SSSA): The New


Paper Trail

Joseph O’Neil, the author of the novel Netherland, talks with Guernica about political fiction, his favorite Supreme Court decision, and the characters in his new book of stories, Good Trouble: “These are, for the most part, bourgeois American men and women that we’re reading about. They don’t lay a greater claim to one’s compassion or

Syllabi

The Roots of the Alt-right

Mike WendlingDuring the last presidential election cycle, you may have read reports describing the alt-right—a loosely organized group of anti-PC, anti-feminist, race-obsessed online warriors—as a strange, newly

Daily Review

The Overstory

Richard Powers’s latest novel seems like a response to the call for serious fiction of the Anthropocene. Focusing on the 1990s “timber wars” in California’s redwood forests, The Overstory treats the idea of agency as a collective one, and depicts the human realm as inextricable from the natural world.

Interviews

Keith Gessen

Keith Gessen’s timely and hilarious new novel, A Terrible Country, arrives ten years after his first, All the Sad Young Literary Men. The story follows Andrei Kaplan, an overeducated, underemployed young academic as he relocates to Moscow to look after his sick grandmother in the summer of 2008. Over the course of the year, Andrei cares for his grandmother, plays hockey, befriends revolutionaries, and falls in love.

Video

Bookforum: "Bleeding Hearts"

Excerpt

The Man Without a Nation

Amitava Kumar

The one activity that was perhaps the most stable part of my identity that first semester was the seminar I was taking with Ehsaan Ali. His class Colonial Encounters was held on Friday afternoons. The seminar participants required his special permission to join.

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