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Omnivore

Climate change matters more than anything

Christopher R. Rossi (Iowa): The Nomos of Climate Change and the Sociological Refugee in a Sinking Century. One of the most worrisome predictions about climate change may be coming true. John Quiggin on why “extremely unlikely” climate events matter. The Paris climate accords are looking more and more like fantasy. Helena Sheehan reviews The Progress of This Storm: Nature and Society in a Warming World by Andreas Malm (and more). We are almost certainly underestimating the economic risks of


Paper Trail

Bleacher Report and Bustle founder Bryan Goldberg bought Gawker at auction yesterday for $1.13 million. The deal will be approved by a bankruptcy judge on Tuesday. “We have no immediate plans to re-launch Gawker,” Goldberg wrote in an email obtained by CNN after the sale. “For now, things will stay as they are. I’m very

Syllabi

The Roots of the Alt-right

Mike WendlingDuring the last presidential election cycle, you may have read reports describing the alt-right—a loosely organized group of anti-PC, anti-feminist, race-obsessed online warriors—as a strange, newly

Daily Review

The Overstory

Richard Powers’s latest novel seems like a response to the call for serious fiction of the Anthropocene. Focusing on the 1990s “timber wars” in California’s redwood forests, The Overstory treats the idea of agency as a collective one, and depicts the human realm as inextricable from the natural world.

Interviews

Keith Gessen

Keith Gessen’s timely and hilarious new novel, A Terrible Country, arrives ten years after his first, All the Sad Young Literary Men. The story follows Andrei Kaplan, an overeducated, underemployed young academic as he relocates to Moscow to look after his sick grandmother in the summer of 2008. Over the course of the year, Andrei cares for his grandmother, plays hockey, befriends revolutionaries, and falls in love.

Video

Bookforum: "Bleeding Hearts"

Excerpt

The Man Without a Nation

Amitava Kumar

The one activity that was perhaps the most stable part of my identity that first semester was the seminar I was taking with Ehsaan Ali. His class Colonial Encounters was held on Friday afternoons. The seminar participants required his special permission to join.

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