• Lorrie Moore
    October 05, 2010

    Oct 5, 2010 @ 9:00:00 am

    This morning, on the day before the Frankfurt Book Fair, former Soft Skull editor Richard Nash announced the Spring 2011 list for Red Lemonade, the first imprint of his "insurgent publishing start-up" Cursor. It's an exciting list, which includes Someday This Will Be Funny, a new story collection by Bookforum contributor and American Genius: A Comedy author Lynne Tillman.

    Elissa Bassist publishes the excellent notes she took during Lorrie Moore's witty conversation with New Yorker fiction editor Deborah Treisman, in which she talked about humor, MFA programs, and her "ideal reader."

    When the

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  • Lydia Davis
    October 04, 2010

    Oct 4, 2010 @ 9:00:00 am

    Tonight at the 92nd Street Y, Lydia Davis reads from her new translation of Flaubert's Madame Bovary. Davis's translations are as bracing and revelatory as her acclaimed short fiction, and her reflections on the process are always edifying (she's been blogging about translating Bovary at the Paris Review's Daily). Quick quiz: How would you translate the phrase, bouffées d’affadissement, from Bovary: 1. Gusts of revulsion 2. A kind of rancid staleness 3. Whiffs of sickliness? According to Davis, these are just some of the ways it has been rendered into English over the years. In a 2009 interview

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  • Stephen Elliott
    October 01, 2010

    Oct 1, 2010 @ 9:00:00 am

    Martin Amis's State of England: Lionel Asbo, Lotto Lout, David Bowie's Object, Kiran Desai's The Loneliness of Sonia and Sunny, Naomi Wood's The Godless Boys. Agents reveal some of the big titles they'll bring to this year's Frankfurt Book Fair.

    Actor and author James Franco has bought the rights to Stephen Elliott's excellent The Adderall Diaries, which blends memoir, true-crime reportage, and meditations on the trickiness of storytelling. If all goes according to plan, Franco will write the script, direct, and star in the film. Elliott, who founded The Rumpus, seemed happy about the

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  • September 30, 2010

    Sep 30, 2010 @ 11:58:00 am

    Hugo Lindgren, the former editorial director of New York magazine and more recently the executive editor of Businessweek, has just been hired to be the new editor of the New York Times Magazine, a title long held by his onetime colleague, New York's Adam Moss. Bill Keller has been looking to the NYTM's biggest competitors to make the replacement: As the Observer recently reported, he first offered the job to the New Yorker's Daniel Zalewski, who turned him down.

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  • Ted Berrigan
    September 30, 2010

    Sep 30, 2010 @ 9:00:00 am

    Tonight, we'll be at Poets House, where Douglas A. Martin and Eileen Myles will read their work. Myles's new book is Inferno, an autobiographical novel about becoming a poet in New York. Like most good autobiographical novels about writers, this one is gossipy (watch for stories about Ted Berrigan) (and even Richard Hell), sometimes cutting (a passage about Kathy Acker comes to mind), but never quite spiteful.

    Jonathan Lethem, best known for his novels about Brooklyn (though he's also written about Manhattan) (and about black holes), will set his next book in Queens. Will the Bronx or

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  • Yiyun Li
    September 29, 2010

    Sep 29, 2010 @ 9:00:00 am

    The 2010 MacArthur Fellows have been announced, with three authors among the twenty-three winners. Journalist and television-guru David Simon, fiction writer Yiyun Li, and historian Annette Gordon-Reed now all have license to affix the word genius to their name.

    Barnes and Noble chairman Leonard Riggio and his group of board of director candidates have withstood a strong challenge from Los Angeles investor Ron Burkle, as shareholders have voted to re-elect Riggio and his supporters. As shareholder Howard Tannenbaum put it: "Riggio and his brother built up the company. What does Burkle know

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  • September 28, 2010

    Sep 28, 2010 @ 12:00:00 pm

    TALKING TO SARA MARCUS ABOUT RIOT GRRRL

    Sara Marcus’s Girls to the Front, an engaging chronicle of the early-’90s punk feminist movement known as Riot Grrrl, is being published today by Harper Perennial. Writing in Bookforum’s music issue, musician and author Johanna Fateman called the book an “ambitious and convincing book that makes narrative sense out of events that had so far been recorded only in mythic, unverified, and fragmentary form.” We recently sat down with Marcus, who is a freelancer at our sister publication Artforum, to discuss her writing process, feminism’s fate in mainstream

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  • Jason Schwartzman
    September 28, 2010

    Sep 28, 2010 @ 9:00:00 am

    This week's New Yorker is available in a new iPad version, with a nifty animated cover by David Hockney. In a note to readers, the New Yorker editors write nostalgically about the magazine’s early days, noting the scarcity of pencils, and marveling that founder Harold Ross "could not have imagined a day when the magazine would be available as quickly to a reader in Manchester or Madrid as to one in Manhattan." They assure readers that "print remains, by miles, our most popular form," before telling us how they really feel. "We’re at once delighted and a little bewildered about this latest

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  • Don Delillo
    September 27, 2010

    Sep 27, 2010 @ 9:00:00 am

    This weekend, we witnessed the maiden voyage of the Wall Street Journal's new stand-alone Books section; Publisher's Weekly chats with editor Robert Messenger.

    Farenheit 451, 2010: The Pentagon held a book burning on September 20th, destroying 9,500 hundred copies of Operation Dark Heart. The book's author, Anthony Shaffer, told CNN: "The whole premise smacks of retaliation. . . . Someone buying 10,000 books to suppress a story in this digital age is ludicrous." And if you can't burn 'em, ban them: September 25th marks the beginning of banned books week; did someone really think it was a

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  • Keith Gessen
    September 24, 2010

    Sep 24, 2010 @ 9:00:00 am

    Via the Casual Optimist: Design consulting firm IDEO offers three visions for the future of the book, and, unsurprisingly, print isn't on the agenda. IDEO's video outlining their ideas is so blithe and whimsical that we we were swept up for a moment in their somewhat surreal concepts, such as "Alice," an interactive e-book that aims to "[blur] the lines between reality and fiction." As the narrator cheerfully intones, "stories unfold and develop through reader's active participation . . . unexpectedly the reader stumbles upon plot twists and turns, embeded in the stories that are unlocked

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  • Jessica Duffin Wolfe, photo by Liz Clayton
    September 23, 2010

    Sep 23, 2010 @ 3:00:00 pm

    AN INTERVIEW WITH JESSICA DUFFIN WOLFE, AN EDITOR OF THE FORTHCOMING TORONTO REVIEW OF BOOKS

    Print book reviews have been having a tough time in the past decade, but there are grounds for optimism in the online world. And though the web makes it easy to cross borders, there is still a case to be made for grounding a publication in a specific locale. One example of both that has been getting a lot of attention is the new Los Angeles Review of Books, which is scheduled to launch in early 2011. In an interview with the Chronicle of Higher Education, editor Tom Lutz says “The majority of our

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  • Leon Wieseltier
    September 23, 2010

    Sep 23, 2010 @ 9:00:00 am

    FSG publicity and marketing vice-president Jeff Seroy is pals with the New Republic's literary editor Leon Wieseltier—the two seem compelled to inform people that they went to Columbia together. But when Seroy dismissed TNR's less-than-fawning review (by Ruth Franklin) of Jonathan Franzen's Freedom by saying that Wieseltier "specializes in drawing attention to his pages through consistently negative reviews," the old collegial spirit quickly dissipated. Wieseltier has responded to the charge by penning a rousing defense of the value of negative reviews in a literary world "that is amiable,

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