Dawn Chan

  • interviews January 03, 2017

    Bookforum talks with Judith E. Stein

    Judith E, Stein's book Eye of the Sixties: Richard Bellamy and the Transformation of Modern Art examines the life of the art dealer who founded the fabled Green Gallery and was an early champion of artists including Mark di Suvero, Claes Oldenburg, James Rosenquist, and Donald Judd.

    Judith E. Stein's book Eye of the Sixties: Richard Bellamy and the Transformation of Modern Art examines the life of the art dealer who founded the fabled Green Gallery and was an early champion of artists including Mark di Suvero, Claes Oldenburg, James Rosenquist, and Donald Judd. Stein's investigation—built on interviews with Bellamy's friends, family, colleagues, and lovers—spans from Bellamy's Cincinnati childhood as the son of an American father and a Chinese mother, to his time in Provincetown with members of the beat generation, to his later interactions with collectors (and Green

  • culture November 04, 2015

    Strangers Drowning by Larissa MacFarquhar

    One of the foremost proponents of effective altruism, Singer has long pointed out that we ought to save the life of a far-away child with as much zeal as we would save a child drowning in a nearby pond. His classic “shallow-pond” thought experiment inspires the titular premise of Larissa MacFarquhar’s book Strangers Drowning: Grappling with Impossible Idealism, Drastic Choices, and the Overpowering Urge to Help, which profiles over a dozen uncommonly virtuous individuals who pursue committedly ethical lives—often at great personal cost.

    Few living philosophers’ names elicit quite as much public recognition and scorn as that of the utilitarian ethicist Peter Singer, who has argued in support of animal liberation, euthanasia, and even, in some extreme cases, infanticide. In the 1990s, when Singer’s mother, Cora, fell victim to Alzheimer’s, it was with almost vituperative glee that critics seized on the fact that Singer and his siblings spent huge amounts of money on her care, insinuating that he’d betrayed his own morality-by-the-numbers arguments.

    One of the foremost proponents of effective altruism, Singer has long pointed