Yamanucci Molin

  • interviews April 16, 2012

    Bookforum talks to Laurent Dubois

    What most people know about Haiti can be reduced to two statements: Haiti is the first independent black nation—the country declared its independence from France on January 1, 1804 amidst stifling political hostility—and Haiti is presently the poorest country in the Western hemisphere, The series of events leading up to that victory and those that followed are often overshadowed by media images of malnourished children and bedraggled homes, In his most recent book, Haiti: The Aftershocks of History, historian and Duke University professor Laurent Dubois considers this lapse in historical memory.

    What most people know about Haiti can be reduced to two statements: Haiti is the world's first independent black nation—the country declared its independence from France on January 1, 1804—and Haiti is presently the poorest country in the Western hemisphere. Unfortunately, the country's political victories are often overshadowed by media images of malnourished children and bedraggled homes. In his most recent book, Haiti: The Aftershocks of History, historian and Duke University professor Laurent Dubois considers this lapse in historical memory.

    Aftershocks of History unpacks Haiti’s legacy