• Salman Rushdie
    October 12, 2010

    Oct 12, 2010 @ 9:00:00 am

    Salman Rushdie is writing a memoir about the years he spent in hiding beginning in 1989, when the Ayatollah Khomeini decreed that Rushdie should be killed for the "blasphemy" in his novel The Satanic Verses. Rushdie says of the memoir, "So far I feel that I'm right—I'm not getting churned up and upset, I'm just writing it and I'm feeling quite pleased."

    UbuWeb, the great online archive of avant-garde poetry, film, music, and performance has been hacked and is closed "until further notice."

    Now that Hugo Lindgren has been named the editor of the New York Times Magazine, what should he do with

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  • Tom McCarthy: odds-on favorite for the Man Booker prize.
    October 11, 2010

    Oct 11, 2010 @ 9:00:00 am

    Imprisoned 2010 Nobel Peace Prize-winning author Liu Xiaobo has been unable to talk to journalists since the award was announced on Friday, and his wife, Liu Xia, is now under house arrest. During a short visit, Liu told his wife that he was dedicating the prize to victims of the 1989 Tiananmen Square crackdown. Chinese authorities have called the Nobel a "blasphemy," imposed a blackout on news of the prize, and broken up a banquet celebrating the victory.

    The Frankfurt Book Fair ended on Sunday, with novelist David Grossman taking home the fest's Peace prize. Grossman will be appearing tonight

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  • Liu Xiaobo
    October 08, 2010

    Oct 8, 2010 @ 9:00:00 am

    The Nobel Peace Prize has been awarded to imprisoned Chinese author and human rights activist Liu Xiaobo. The PEN American Center has been campaigning for Xiaobo to win the prize (and for his release); last December, authors E. L. Doctorow, Don DeLillo, Kwame Anthony Appiah, Edward Albee, A.M. Homes, and Honor Moore gathered on the New York Public Library's steps to rally on his behalf.

    More on 2010 Nobel Prize in literature winner Mario Vargas Llosa: the author's first press conference after winning the Nobel; Granta editor John Freeman on why Vargas Llosa was a "phenomenal choice" for the

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  • Mario Vargas Llosa
    October 07, 2010

    Oct 7, 2010 @ 9:00:00 am

    Peruvian writer Mario Vargas Llosa has won the Nobel Prize in literature, becoming the first South American writer to win the 1.5 million dollar prize since Gabriel Garcia Marquez won it in 1982. Perhaps the shared glory will end the longstanding feud between the two authors, which climaxed the day Vargas Llosa decked Garcia Marquez in a movie theater, leaving him with a black eye.

    OR books co-publisher John Oakes describes the imprint's unique business model at the Frankfurt Book Fair.

    Tonight, NYU is hosting a memorial celebration for David Markson, the experimental novelist (and David

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  • Grace Krilanovich
    October 06, 2010

    Oct 6, 2010 @ 9:00:00 am

    At Publishing Perspectives, Chad W. Post reports on why Douglas Rushkoff, who will speak at the Frankfurt Book Fair, moved from Random House to the innovative start-up publisher OR Books: "With the traditional publishing system, there are too many middlemen, and too many people needing to justify their place in the food chain,” he says. “This ends up costing a lot of money, and ultimately costing a lot of time, too.”

    Tonight, New York City's prose fetishists and fans of experimental fiction will likely be heading to a talk titled "On the Well-Tempered Sentence," featuring Gary Lutz, Ben

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  • Lorrie Moore
    October 05, 2010

    Oct 5, 2010 @ 9:00:00 am

    This morning, on the day before the Frankfurt Book Fair, former Soft Skull editor Richard Nash announced the Spring 2011 list for Red Lemonade, the first imprint of his "insurgent publishing start-up" Cursor. It's an exciting list, which includes Someday This Will Be Funny, a new story collection by Bookforum contributor and American Genius: A Comedy author Lynne Tillman.

    Elissa Bassist publishes the excellent notes she took during Lorrie Moore's witty conversation with New Yorker fiction editor Deborah Treisman, in which she talked about humor, MFA programs, and her "ideal reader."

    When the

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  • Lydia Davis
    October 04, 2010

    Oct 4, 2010 @ 9:00:00 am

    Tonight at the 92nd Street Y, Lydia Davis reads from her new translation of Flaubert's Madame Bovary. Davis's translations are as bracing and revelatory as her acclaimed short fiction, and her reflections on the process are always edifying (she's been blogging about translating Bovary at the Paris Review's Daily). Quick quiz: How would you translate the phrase, bouffées d’affadissement, from Bovary: 1. Gusts of revulsion 2. A kind of rancid staleness 3. Whiffs of sickliness? According to Davis, these are just some of the ways it has been rendered into English over the years. In a 2009 interview

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  • Stephen Elliott
    October 01, 2010

    Oct 1, 2010 @ 9:00:00 am

    Martin Amis's State of England: Lionel Asbo, Lotto Lout, David Bowie's Object, Kiran Desai's The Loneliness of Sonia and Sunny, Naomi Wood's The Godless Boys. Agents reveal some of the big titles they'll bring to this year's Frankfurt Book Fair.

    Actor and author James Franco has bought the rights to Stephen Elliott's excellent The Adderall Diaries, which blends memoir, true-crime reportage, and meditations on the trickiness of storytelling. If all goes according to plan, Franco will write the script, direct, and star in the film. Elliott, who founded The Rumpus, seemed happy about the

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  • September 30, 2010

    Sep 30, 2010 @ 11:58:00 am

    Hugo Lindgren, the former editorial director of New York magazine and more recently the executive editor of Businessweek, has just been hired to be the new editor of the New York Times Magazine, a title long held by his onetime colleague, New York's Adam Moss. Bill Keller has been looking to the NYTM's biggest competitors to make the replacement: As the Observer recently reported, he first offered the job to the New Yorker's Daniel Zalewski, who turned him down.

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  • Ted Berrigan
    September 30, 2010

    Sep 30, 2010 @ 9:00:00 am

    Tonight, we'll be at Poets House, where Douglas A. Martin and Eileen Myles will read their work. Myles's new book is Inferno, an autobiographical novel about becoming a poet in New York. Like most good autobiographical novels about writers, this one is gossipy (watch for stories about Ted Berrigan) (and even Richard Hell), sometimes cutting (a passage about Kathy Acker comes to mind), but never quite spiteful.

    Jonathan Lethem, best known for his novels about Brooklyn (though he's also written about Manhattan) (and about black holes), will set his next book in Queens. Will the Bronx or

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  • Yiyun Li
    September 29, 2010

    Sep 29, 2010 @ 9:00:00 am

    The 2010 MacArthur Fellows have been announced, with three authors among the twenty-three winners. Journalist and television-guru David Simon, fiction writer Yiyun Li, and historian Annette Gordon-Reed now all have license to affix the word genius to their name.

    Barnes and Noble chairman Leonard Riggio and his group of board of director candidates have withstood a strong challenge from Los Angeles investor Ron Burkle, as shareholders have voted to re-elect Riggio and his supporters. As shareholder Howard Tannenbaum put it: "Riggio and his brother built up the company. What does Burkle know

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  • September 28, 2010

    Sep 28, 2010 @ 12:00:00 pm

    TALKING TO SARA MARCUS ABOUT RIOT GRRRL

    Sara Marcus’s Girls to the Front, an engaging chronicle of the early-’90s punk feminist movement known as Riot Grrrl, is being published today by Harper Perennial. Writing in Bookforum’s music issue, musician and author Johanna Fateman called the book an “ambitious and convincing book that makes narrative sense out of events that had so far been recorded only in mythic, unverified, and fragmentary form.” We recently sat down with Marcus, who is a freelancer at our sister publication Artforum, to discuss her writing process, feminism’s fate in mainstream

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