From LRB, from lying to leering: Rebecca Solnit on Donald Trump's fear of women. Jill Filipovic on Ivanka Trump's dangerous fake feminism. "You focus on the good": Women who voted for Trump, in their own words. How unconscious sexism could help explain Trump's win. Jennifer Gerson Uffalussy on how sexism affected the presidential election. It's time to take sexism seriously as a political force. From Interviews for Resistance, Sarah Jaffe interviews Erin Mahoney of National Women's Liberation. Massive Women's March turnout shows Trump's opponents are done underestimating him. Emily Eakin on the crowds that mattered.

"Stop looking to the left or right": After the march, 500 women learned how to run for office. The future of the Left is female: Women's rights are human rights, and women leaders are progressive leaders.


From The Atlantic, Uri Friedman interviews Robert A. Levine and Sarah Levine, authors of Do Parents Matter? Why Japanese Babies Sleep Soundly, Mexican Siblings Don't Fight, and American Families Should Just Relax. Why be a parent? Marcia Angell reviews The Gardener and the Carpenter: What the New Science of Child Development Tells Us About the Relationship Between Parents and Children by Alison Gopnik. Politicizing and practicing motherhood: Natalia Mehlman Petrzela on why we should care what Phyllis Schlafly served her kids for breakfast. How Donald Trump could change what it's like to be a parent in America.


Alexander Morrison (Nazarbayev): Russian Settler Colonialism. Alexander Morrison on Russia's colonial allergy: "The inequalities and hierarchies of power that we associate with 'colonialism' existed and continue to exist in Russia's relations with the non-Russian peoples of its former empire, but they are consistently denied". Amanda Erickson on how the USSR's effort to destroy Islam created a generation of radicals. John Heathershaw and David W. Montgomery (Exeter): Islam, Secularism, and Danger: A Reconsideration of the Link between Religiosity, Radicalism, and Rebellion in Central Asia. The death of the post-Soviet dream: Independence 25 years ago promised to bring freedom and prosperity to Central Asia, but kleptocratic regimes have left many yearning for the past.

You can download The Colour Revolutions in the Former Soviet Republics: Successes and Failures, ed. Donnacha O Beachain and Abel Polese (2010), and download Nation Building in Post-Soviet Spaces: New Tools and Approaches, ed. Abel Polese and Rico Isaacs (2016).


Liam Andrew Kevin Miller (Queensland): Playing With Your Self: A Philosophical Exploration of Attitudes and Identities in Games. The new UN Secretary-General, Antonio Guterres, is a Portuguese socialist who speaks out for refugees. ISIS destroys part of Roman amphitheater in Palmyra, Syria. Can our intuitions about trolley problems be influenced by the presence of the law? Bert I. Huang on law and moral dilemmas. Attack on alt-Right leader has Internet asking: Is it O.K. to punch a Nazi? Jessica Goldstein on the surprising history of "snowflake" as a political insult. Kellyanne Conway finally admits the tax audit was just an excuse. Adam Shatz reviews Ecrits sur l'alienation et la liberte by Frantz Fanon.


Women's march is the biggest protest in US history as an estimated 2.9 million march. This weekend showed how all politics is now global. Melissa Dahl on the psychological importance of joining a march. How being part of a crowd can change you for the better. When protest fails: Popular demonstrations can bring change and topple governments — they can also spark retaliation from those in power. Don't let anybody tell you the marches didn't matter. Trump's attack on the press shows why protests are necessary. Trump's real war isn't with the media — it's with facts. The traditional way of reporting on a president is dead — and Trump's press secretary killed it.

They marched on Washington — now the Left should focus on its own backyard. We are dissidents; we are legion: The Women's March was an uprising. "This thread is called 'So you just got home from your local Women's March. Now what?' Well, some suggestions".


President Donald Trump is a radical extremist: His speech declared war against all enemies, foreign and domestic. Why the most important phrase in Trump's speech might be "civilized world". Obamaism sought strength in unity; Trumpism finds power through division (and more and more). Trump sets up the scapegoats for his presidency. Watch what Donald Trump does, not what he says. You'll learn more about Trump by looking at his new website than listening to his speech. The system has failed and a con artist has won: What happens when the marks are demanding that the promises he made be redeemed, and there is nowhere for him to go, and he commands the powers of the state?

Anti-elitism, the Trump version: It's all been Washington's fault — Wall Street, what's that? Donald Trump's eternal campaign: The new president's first actions in office suggest his style from the trail isn't going away soon.


From the New Yorker, the music Donald Trump can't hear: Adam Gopnik writes about Donald Trump's disconnection from American cultural life, and what people must do to resist him; and how do you fight an enemy who's just kidding? Emily Nussbaum on how jokes won the election. When politics invades the personal: Joan Golden-Alexis on a new mandate for psychoanalysis in the Trump era. Trump, a Resister's Guide: As a once-unthinkable Trump presidency gets under way, it is time to recognize that we are not as impotent as we may have felt — that even if we cannot destroy Trump, we can resist his primitive vision to the best of our abilities. Democrats prepare for Trump with one of the earliest resistance movements ever to greet a new president. Sammy Leonard on how the nihilistic purity of the far Left will kill us all.

We are the last defense against Trump: America's institutions weren't designed to resist a modern strongman — that leaves civil society. The return of civil disobedience: The sixties produced a conviction that "democracy is in the streets" — the Trump era may echo that. The history and future of activism in America: Sarah Jaffe reviews Direct Action: Protest and the Reinvention of American Radicalism by L. A. Kauffman and Hegemony How-To: A Roadmap for Radicals by Jonathan Matthew Smucker. Interviews for resistance: Sarah Jaffe interviews Legba Carrefour of DisruptJ20. Lawyers are descending on Washington to help protesters.


From 538, Nate Silver on the real story of 2016: What reporters — and lots of data geeks, too — missed about the election, and what they're still getting wrong. Did God choose Trump? Lauren Markoe on what it means to believe in divine intervention. "Thank You Lord Jesus for President Trump": Jonathan Cole on apostolic theology and the evangelical vote. John Paul Rollert on the moral improbability of the Trump campaign. Masha Gessen on the threat of moral authority. Ronald Klain on 5 new rules from the Trump scandal playbook. John Mikhail on the original meaning of "emolument". It's not a post-fact world after all: Jane Chong on why Kompromat can't touch Trump yet. Amanda Taub on "kompromat" and the danger of doubt and confusion in a democracy.

Yes, Trump will face a backlash if he doesn't deliver on his promises — but which promises are his supporters counting on? What President Trump actually plans to do on Day One: He's made impossible promises for his first day, but he's expected to start by tackling health care, immigration, and terrorism. Donald Trump is ready to take an ax to government spending. Congress moves to give away national lands, discounting billions in revenue. "America will soon be thrust into cultural and societal deterioration, a new Dark Ages". Jonathan Chait on 6 books that explain how the GOP went crazy.

President Trump could mean economic policy via presidential decree. Why the Trump economic boom will never come: Yes, the markets are looking good (for now) — but subsidized deal-making and tax cuts for the rich are the surest sign of a bubble. Trump is putting the wolves of Wall Street in charge of America's economy. Luigi Zingales on Donald Trump's economic policies: Pro-business, not pro-market ("Trump is eliminating lobbyists by putting them in charge of all departments"). The Trump lobbying purge that wasn't: The transition made a big show of sidelining lobbyists, but they found ways to stay involved anyway.

Well before his inauguration, Trump's incoming administration and Cabinet picks were breaking down definitions of conflict of interest and stretching the bounds of normalcy — far from "draining the swamp," Trump has added to it. GOP unmoved by controversies surrounding Trump's cabinet picks. Yes, Trump's Cabinet is super rich — that's not why we should be worried. Donald Trump has assembled the worst Cabinet in American history. The GOP is sabotaging itself by confirming weak Cabinet nominees like Betsy DeVos. Trump is setting up the government in a way that promises chaos: Empowering the Cabinet sounds good in theory, but it hasn't worked out for past presidents.

Scott McLemee reviews Robert E. Denton Jr.'s scholarship on the American presidency, which highlights how immediately coping with the lack of any guidebook is one of the most urgent demands of the office. Matthew Yglesias on 7 big questions about the Trump administration: The known unknowns. Is the Trump team ready to run the government? Trump should probably get around to filling these 662 jobs (and more). The first great natural experiment of the Trump administration: The Trump administration will test many assumptions about public administration, policymaking, and politics — here's the first one.

Putin is using spy tactics to split NATO from the inside. Russians are trying to figure out Donald Trump too. Is North Korea about to welcome Donald Trump into office with its first-ever ICBM flight test? Trump's nuclear wake-up call: "It's a sobering moment", Bush's chief of staff says about the classified nuclear briefing before a president's swearing-in. Thread: "Tonight, every major geopolitical and non-state adversary the US has is reviewing their post-Jan. 20 notes and nodding approvingly".


Trump entering White House unbent and unpopular. Donald Trump thinks approval ratings are rigged — that's scarier than you think: Ignoring approval ratings removes a major check on Trump's power. "He has this deep fear that he is not a legitimate president": On the eve of the inauguration, Trump's biographers ponder his refusal to bend his ego to his new office. Donald Trump is so scared to come out of his house and be president. Pissologies: Sam Kriss on the psychoses that animate the most powerful man in the world. Sapna Maheshwari on 10 times Trump spread fake news. Truth in the age of Trump: No one who backed Trump has any excuse for being surprised by what he does — we all know who and what he is. Stop waiting for Trump to start making sense — or his lackeys, or the deplorables.

Donald the Unready: The new president will be corrupt and crazy, but he'll also be incompetent. Eric Posner posts The Dictator's Handbook, U.S. edition. Welcome to the Trump Dark Age: Either his presidency is an aberration or the dawn of a intolerant, regressive era (and more).


Crispin Thurlow (Bern) and Jamie Moshin (Michigan): What the F#@$: Policing and Performing the Unmentionable in the News. From Three Percent, are we living in a backward world? Chad W. Post on reader selection and market acceleration and on the structural inequality of comp titles. Esther Franke on the meaning of Michelle: First black First Lady as outsider within and agent of change. Which Michelle Obama will we get when she leaves the White House? The "mom in chief" charmed late-night hosts and hula-hooped with kids, but she wasn't her full self in public. The introduction to Ernst Kantorowicz: A Life by Robert E. Lerner. Andrew Scull on his book Madness in Civilization: A Cultural History of Insanity, from the Bible to Freud, from the Madhouse to Modern Medicine.

The Left's divisions will be on display at the inauguration. Elijah Cummings: "If the public knew what Congress knows" they would boycott the inauguration too. How performing at Trump's inauguration — or not — became a political statement.

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