Advertisement

Omnivore

The glory of math is to matter

Catherine Rowett (East Anglia): Philosophy's Numerical Turn: Why the Pythagoreans' Interest in Numbers Is Truly Awesome. From PUP, the introduction to Count Like an Egyptian: A Hands-on Introduction to Ancient Mathematics by David Reimer; the introduction to Taming the Unknown: A History of Algebra from Antiquity to the Early Twentieth Century by Victor J. Katz and Karen Hunger Parshall; the introduction to Enlightening Symbols: A Short History of Mathematical Notation and Its Hidden Powers by


Paper Trail

In honor of the end of the Colbert Report, the New Republic collects clips of some of Stephen Colbert’s best author interviews—with Toni Morrison, George Saunders, and Richard Ford, among others. On the New York Review of Books blog, Michael Greenberg reflects on the protests in the wake of the grand-jury decision over the Eric Garner

Syllabi

Andre Dubus's best characters

Bibi DeitzAndre Dubus's literary superpower is to hit upon that one thing about a character that makes him him, or her her. And in so doing, with subtle, clever details—breadcrumbs on the trail to the nucleus

Daily Review

The Dog

We now see a new kind of migration: that of the cosmopolitan, the emigrant, the exile pushed out into the world, spreading away from the imperial center. The protagonists begin in the metropoles and often end up in the provinces. Consummate insiders—bankers, lawyers, doctors, professors—they find themselves on the outside. In a state of seemingly endless movement, this new figure finds him- or herself a perennial stranger.

Interviews

Meghan Daum

Meghan Daum published her first collection of essays, My Misspent Youth (2001), to wide praise. In the title essay, Daum described living in Manhattan as a writer in her mid-twenties, and the difficulty of discerning truth from fantasy in a city that lends itself to easy mythologizing.

Video

Get Adobe Flash player

The Ayn Rand Self-Obsessed Cult Has Run Amok!

Excerpt

A Store of Half-Knowledge

Charles D'Ambrosio

The essay, at its best, is a genre shaped by the character of its author. Charles D’Ambrosio describes it as “a forum for self-doubt.” The author’s irresolution runs throughout Loitering, his new collection. “We are more intimately bound to one another by our kindred doubts than our brave conclusions,” he notes. By communicating uncertainty, D’Ambrosio eases its isolation.

Advertisement