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Omnivore

The most lethal terrorist organization in the world

Tim Krieger and Daniel Meierrieks (Freiburg): Does Income Inequality Lead to Terrorism? Evidence from the Post-9/11 Era. Christos Boukalas (Cardiff): Class War on Terror: Counterterrorism, Accumulation, Crisis. Albert W. Klein and Dimitrios Delibasis (Westminster): The Need for Attribution in the Era of Global Networked Terrorism. Antonios E. Kouroutakis (CUHK): Islamic Terrorism: The Legal Impact on the US and Europe. Jon Schwartz on how Cheney thought al Qaeda was bluffing. “The true ugly


Paper Trail

As HarperCollins prepare to publish the most pre-ordered book in their history, Harper Lee’s Go Set a Watchman, the plot thickens in terms of just when and how the lost-and-found novel came to light—it was apparently several years earlier than Lee’s lawyer, Tonja Carter, had announced to readers, which further complicates the questions already surrounding

Syllabi

The Literature of Obsolescence

Casey Michael HenryWilliam Gaddis, the author perhaps most concerned with the entropic decay of older systems and organizational principles in fiction, famously taught a class at Bard College in 1979 on "The Literature

Daily Review

A City of One's Own

The Men in My Life, Vivian Gornick’s 2008 collection of critical writing, begins with an essay on the nineteenth-century British novelist George Gissing. Gornick particularly admires his novel The Odd Women (1893). In the book’s feminist reformer, Rhoda Nunn, Gornick

Interviews

Maggie Nelson

Maggie Nelson is the only serious and literary person I've encountered whose speech is filled with more "you knows" than mine. Unlike mine, perhaps, her verbal tic is not so much a crutch as a helping hand: she'll be saying something fast, brilliant, and thoughtful, and maybe you don't totally get it, but when she says "you know," she allows you to feel as if you do.

Miscellaneous

"Force Majeure," Karl Ove Knausgaard, and the Disease of Manhood

Dan Duray

Sweden has produced two of the most powerful contemporary renderings of manhood as a disease, as a sickness that contaminates the nuclear family. Force Majeure, directed by Ruben Ostund, addressed the modern family and its masculine saboteurs more directly than any other film last year. And then of course there's My Struggle, Karl Ove Knausgaard's epic inventory of one man's failures as a husband and a father.

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