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Omnivore

Labor, power, and politics

Barry Eidlin (Rutgers): Class vs. Special Interest: Labor, Power, and Politics in the United States and Canada in the Twentieth Century. Ilana Gershon (Indiana): Selling Your Self in the United States. Junk the phrase “human capital” — the term has added nothing but conceptual confusion for the last 50 years. Jessica Fink (California Western): Madonnas and Whores in the Workplace. Elizabeth Stoker Bruenig on how the death of American unions is killing American marriage. Cynthia L. Estlund (NYU):


Paper Trail

When the New York Post reported Jill Abramson’s new book deal with Simon and Schuster last week, it noted that some at the New York Times might be “nervous” about the book (Abramson was “abruptly dismissed” from her position as the paper’s executive editor last year). The New York Times has now run a story

Syllabi

Andre Dubus's best characters

Bibi DeitzAndre Dubus's literary superpower is to hit upon that one thing about a character that makes him him, or her her. And in so doing, with subtle, clever details—breadcrumbs on the trail to the nucleus

Daily Review

Shrinks: The Untold Story of Psychiatry

Has there ever been a medical specialty as beleaguered as psychiatry? Since the profession's founding in 1844, the doctors of the soul have had to contend with suspicions that they do not know what mental illness is, what type their patients might have, or what they should do about it—in other words, that they are doctors who do not practice real medicine.

    Interviews

    Miranda July

    In Miranda July's films and short stories, the protagonist is usually shut off from the world: insular, habit-prone, and to the outside world, a little weird, The beauty of Cheryl Glickman, the narrator of July's debut novel, The First Bad Man, is that she's come to see her idiosyncrasies as totally logical, After reading several pages of Cheryl's chatty internal monologue, the reader will, too.

    Profile

    The Autotelic Atticus Lish

    Catherine Foulkrod

    "I told my wife, 'Baby, I want to write twenty books,' and it's not a boast; it's because I believe in the Zen process. You know, if you rake a garden for fifty years, insight comes. My struggle right now is to make it no struggle. If I can do that, I can be a machine. I want to keep pumping out books because rarely can you just knock out a homerun. A perfect book only happens if you roll the dice a bunch of times. Take Cormac McCarthy

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