Blame Facebook and Cambridge Analytica for the damage they’ve done

Isobel Thompson on the secret history of Steve Bannon and Alexander Nix, explained. Adrian Chen on Cambridge Analytica and our lives inside the surveillance machine. How democracy can survive big data: We can blame Facebook and Cambridge Analytica for the damage they’ve done, but the responsibility lies with all of us. If you want to expose more Cambridge Analyticas, it’s time to rehabilitate the sting. The Cambridge Analytica con: Yasha Levine on how media coverage misses the mark on the Trump

Paper Trail

The Atlantic has hired four new columnists for its soon to be launched ideas, opinions, and commentary section. In this new feature of the website, Ibram X. Kendi, Kevin D. Williamson, Annie Lowrey, and Alex Wagner “will help readers understand the key issues of the day, introduce novel evidence and reporting to the debate, and


Marriage Reimagined

Laura SmithIt is easy to view the vast and varied landscape of marriage in the present day as a radical departure from a more conservative past. But many of these marriage alternatives—including polyamory, open

Daily Review

The Sparsholt Affair

A fan of Alan Hollinghurst’s masterpiece The Line of Beauty has created a Twitter account, @lollinghurst, to document the many epigrams and sly jokes and thrillingly acute descriptions found throughout that novel. These “lines of beauty” don’t just serve to decorate the


Jenn Pelly

“The Raincoats were a group of women who were, in part, just learning to play their instruments, but their debut album also coincides with the start of a whole artistic sensibility, one of fearless and knowing amateurism,” Pitchfork contributing editor Jenn Pelly writes in her recent book about the origins of the Raincoats, part of Bloomsbury’s 33 1/3 music writing series.


Minds of the Immortals: Emily Wilson on translating "The Odyssey"

Ben Shields

“The minds of the immortals rarely change,” old King Nestor tells Telemachus in Book III of The Odyssey, That may be true, but the ways that we experience and imagine those gods change regularly, Since the sixteenth century, dozens of English-language translators have traversed the epics of archaic Hellas, and all of them have returned with their own unique account: Blank verse, couplets, and prose are all available portals into Homer.