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Omnivore

The biggest new idea in international development

Oana Borcan and Ola Olsson (Goteborg) and Louis Putterman (Brown): State History and Economic Development: Evidence from Six Millennia. Luciana Cingolani (UNU) and Kaj Thomsson and Denis De Crombrugghe (Maastricht): Minding Weber More than Ever? The Impacts of State Capacity and Bureaucratic Autonomy on Development Goals. Heiner Janus, Stephan Klingebie, and Sebastian Paulo (DIE): “Beyond Aid” and the Future of Development Cooperation. Jackson Faust (Birkbeck): Keep the Flow Going: the Global


Paper Trail

OkCupid’s popular blog, OkTrends, is back after a three-year hiatus. Written by Christian Rudder, a co-founder of the dating website, the blog returns with a post mocking Facebook’s recent data-collection scandal—not making fun of Facebook, as you might think, but rather what Rudder considers the naive outrage of its users: “Guess what, everybody: if you use

Syllabi

Weird Sex

Vanessa RovetoThere's good sex and there's bad sex. And then there's weird sex—a Freudian purgatory that somehow neither stimulates the libido nor inhibits it. In art and life, we're inclined to seek out pleasure

Daily Review

In the Wolf's Mouth

Each of Adam Foulds's recent novels suggests a cloud-chamber into which some physicist has introduced particles that won't bond. With In the Wolf's Mouth, the author ratchets up the conflict considerably. The novel takes place during World War II, primarily in Sicily, where "liberation" only unearths deeper discord, much of it instigated by the Mafia.

Interviews

William T. Vollmann

William T. Vollmann's latest story collection considers death from a variety of perspectives, veering from realistic to supernatural, from reportage-like writing to the ghost story. Bookforum talks with the author about his new book, his FBI files, his ongoing research of coal mines and the environment, and his female persona, Delores.

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PEN World Voices: What Went Wrong?

Excerpt

An Air of Impoverishment and Depleted Humanity

Amanda Petrusich

In Do Not Sell at Any Price, Amanda Petrusich visits the secretive, insular world of 78rpm collectors. The oldest version of the record, these 10-inch, two-song albums are increasingly hard to track down. Finding a matching turntable is a feat in itself. The scarcity has kept the number of hobbyists small, and their devotion to “the treasure hunt” fanatical. As Petrusich explains, her interest in 78s began as a nostalgic protest

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