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Omnivore

Inside the Ebola wars

Lawrence O. Gostin (Georgetown), James G. Hodge Jr. (ASU), and Scott Burris (Temple): Is the United States Prepared for Ebola? Richard Preston goes inside the Ebola wars: As the epidemic widens, the virus is mutating and geneticists are racing to keep up. Within the escalating debate over how to manage potential threats to public health, the line between vigilance and hysteria can be blurry. Yes, Ebola is scary — but the system is working. To put it bluntly: We’ve entrusted our national


Paper Trail

At Poynter, Andrew Beaujon has posted an opinion piece about three journalism schools that have rescinded invitations to journalists due to fears of Ebola. After quoting the statements explaining the cancellations, Beaujon writes: “‘Caution,’ ‘questions,’ ‘sensitive’—these are all apparently synonyms for willful disregard for facts, which is a curious fit for journalism schools, institutions that purportedly

Syllabi

Sextet

Michael Barron"Writing about music," the saying goes, "is like dancing about architecture." If it's meant to dissuade, the warning has gone unheeded: Over the years, a number of novels about music have ingeniously

Daily Review

Bad Paper: Chasing Debt from Wall Street to the Underworld

With a nod to Elmore Leonard, Bad Paper seeks a bit of love for certain bad or not-so-nice people—the hundreds of debt collectors, some of them ex-cons, who chase down little old ladies on Social Security to cough up their last pennies to pay off the money they borrowed from the likes of Bank of America or Chase. But the marks aren't really paying off the banks. No, the banks long ago sold off these debts to debt buyers like the heroes of this picaresque nonfiction yarn:

Interviews

Eula Biss

As Eula Biss began investigating immunity and public health, her interest moved from the question of fear to the question of how to move past it, and into a discussion of social ethics and care: What does an individual body—scared or not—owe the collective body?

Cinema

Film as Film: The Collected Writings of Gregory J. Markopoulos

Rebekah Rutkoff

A key figure in the New American Cinema of the 1960s, Gregory J.Markopoulos made ambitious films starting in the late ’40s, complex psychodramas and romantic meditations that used symbolic color and rapid montage. For Markopoulos, the delicate and, in his words, “divine” potential of film was too easily damaged when the artist ceded screening responsibility to curators and institutions with their own priorities, both financial and

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